Kola Nuts

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Kola-Nut: The Symbol of Hospitality (title)
•It is a bitter brown seed containing caffeine
•In the past, has been added to drinks to diminish hunger and fatigue •The offering of a Kola-Nut is very important in the igbo culture and is only offered to very important guests •This offering of the Kola-Nut has three steps that must be followed. The first step is the presentation of the kola-nuts. The next is the breaking of the kola-nut and the third is the distribution of the kola-nuts •Presentation of the kola-nut can only be done by privileged men •Kola-nut is passed around until it finally comes back to the guest •Elder will then hold up kola-nut and say a prayer

•Then kola-nuts are eaten

Onyemaechi, Uzoma. "Igbo Culture and Socialization." Igbo Culture. University of Michigan, 26 May 2012. Web. 29 Oct. 2012. <http://www.kwenu.com/igbo/igbowebpages/Igbo.dir/Culture/culture_and_socialization.html>.

Widjaja, Michael. "Kola Nut." Igbo Culture and Igbo Language. N.p., 4 Nov. 2011. Web. 29 Oct. 2012. <http://www.igboguide.org/HT-chapter8.htm>.

"Kola Nut." Energy. N.p., 16 July 2011. Web. 29 Oct. 2012. <http://www.tumblr.com/tagged/kola-nut>.

Igbo Foods
* The Yam is a staple food for Igbo people and civilization * Yam was always abundant, helpful during lean times
* The Iwaji or New Yam festival each year celebrates importance of vegetable in Igbo culture. Prayers offered up and thanks given to the gods and spirits of traditional folklore. * Yam made in many ways

* Can be pealed and boiled or pulped into a doughy consistency to produce pounded yam * Also ate a lot of pumpkins and gari (cassava powder) dumplings * Regular Meals
* Typically soup with meat or fish
* Sided with yams, garri (tapioca), semovita, or jollof rice

Hafner, Dorinda. A Taste of Africa . Berkeley, CA: Ten Speed Press, 1993.

Imoisi, Janice. Cooking Nigerian Style: Delicious African Recipes . Houston, TX: Gayle...
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