Kodak's Challenge

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Faculty of Management Sciences
MKT404 – Marketing Management

Kodak's challenge: Surviving the disruptive "Winds of Change" Second Draft

Spring 2012
Table of content
1. Situational analysis
1.1 Organization / company history ……………………p.2 1.2 Company's Market structure ……………………….p.2 1.3 Company's Position ………………………………...p.3 1.4 Company's Image……………………………………p.4 1.5 Company's Marketing Strategy ……………………..p.4

1.5.1 Porter's Generic Strategy
1.5.2 Dominance Strategy
1.5.3 Innovation Strategy
1.5.4 Growth Strategy
2.6 Company's Competitive Strategy…………………....p. 1.7 Company's Competitive advantage………………….p.5 2. Segmentation and target market
3. Product and services
4. SWOT analysis
4.1 Strengths
4.2 Weaknesses
4.3 Opportunities
4.4 Threats

5. Problems
5.1Competitive pressure
5.2Components of the product
5.3Digital camera features
5.4The decline of photography shops
6. Solutions
6.1Competitive pressure
6.2Components of the product
6.3Digital camera features
6.4The decline of photography shops
7. Recommendation and plan
8. Using three references

1. Situational Analysis
1.1 Company's history:
On January 1st 1881, George Eastman and Henry A, Strong formed a partnership that they did not know would create one of the most legendary marks on the photography market today. Beginning with a simple company of dry plates, Eastman did not want any stone unturned when it came to the photography industry. Ament, P. (2006, October 9) "You press the button, we do the rest" known to be one of the most infamous slogans worldwide. In 1888 George Eastman introduced the phenomena of capturing the most precious moments of your life and keeping them forever through a simple snapshot, people began using the Kodak camera. Technology took its role and as we see today the digital industry has developed a new level of advancement. Companies are now on constant rivalry of developing the newest gadget that will make them the next market leaders. Ament, P. (2006, October 9) This sudden jump created trouble from all aspects of Kodak's usual functionality, giving it no choice but to reconsider all of its operations and apply them in accordance to the market's appeal to easiness and availability of technology or be prepared to completely drown. Although the brand name of Kodak had a particular high trust with consumers in the market this was not enough in order to come in conformity with the rest of the products competing companies are offering.

1.2 Company's market structure:
Market Structure|
Oligopoly| Criteria|
Few| Number of Sellers|
Differentiated| Product characteristics|
High| Barriers of Entry|

The market structure is the way in which a market is organized, based largely on the number of firms in the industry. The four basic market structure models are: perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly. Technology's fast move on a daily basis in addition to consumer's acceptance of it is the equation that led to the aggressive competition in all areas of the market today. In an industry such as Kodak's, number of sellers although maybe few but each have their fair shares in the market, offering they're consumers the latest features. The characteristic of a camera today is differentiated because it purely depends on what is the latest technology available. With the constant change in technology expectations for the best features, latest and most appealing imagery of the camera as well as packaging are much higher than they ever were.

1.3 Company's Positioning:

Position is an effort to influence consumer perception of a brand or product relative to the perception of competing brands or products. Its objective is to occupy a clear, unique, and advantageous position in the consumer's mind. (Luiz, et al., 2008) The entire point of positioning is to set oneself apart not only as a product but in the consumer's mind from an angle...
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