Knight, Death and the Devil

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The name of the artist is Albrecht Durer. The artwork piece is an engraved carving. It is called “Knight, Death and The Devil”. It was created in 1513. Objects I observed in this artwork consist of a dog, a knight on a horse, a horned goat, dead trees, a lizard, a castle, an hourglass and death. The only colors I see are dark charcoal color and white. The overall mood of the work is dark and dreary.

The way the artist used the dark colors against the white made the carving stand out more in aspect of how death was upon the soldier, how it actually followed him and what fate was awaiting him. The effects it has on the carving makes me think that there was no lighter days to come for him, that all that was waiting for him was not faith but death, maybe a horrific tragedy.

The artist design tool to achieve the look of evil and death he show a lot of symbolism, by using the hourglass, maybe showing how much time was left. The devil showing the evilness surrounding us daily day by day, the dog could represent a small piece of faith but it looked like evil was more in the carving more than seeing a brighter future which was not here. Durer’s Christian Knight, armed with his faith, rides fearlessly through a meticulously rendered landscape challenging both death and the devil.

To me this statement means that the knight is not afraid, he follows the faith in his heart and soul. That his faith can overpower the evil that surrounds him. He will continue to hold his head up high and continue moving forward.

This statement means that we all struggle with good and evil, it’s up to us to determine what path to take in life.
Feelings I have when I look at this art work that death and evil surround us every day and that one has the choice to determine what path to take in life. If it is to do good by others or to be bad and hurt others.

This art work was also known as “The Rider”, it represents an allegory on Christian salvation....
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