King Minos

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  • Topic: Minos, Minotaur, Daedalus
  • Pages : 1 (293 words )
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  • Published : February 20, 2011
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Kathy Yannopoulos December 3, 2010 MD&R King Minos
A King and His Folly
King Minos became King of Crete with the help of Poseidon by receiving a bull from the sea. Poseidon ordered King Minos to sacrifice the gleaming white bull to him. However, King Minos, blinded by his own greed, breaks his promise and keeps the beautiful bull while offering a bull from his herd. As a punishment, Poseidon inspires Pasiphae’s strong lust for the bull, and she eventually schemes with Daedalus so that she can mate with the animal. The catastrophic result, the creation of a monstrous half bull-half human, emphasizes King Mino’s’ major folly; he lets his egoism take over, and consequently is labeled a “dangerous tyrant”(15). When Campbell describes, King Minos “ converted a public event to a personal gain, whereas the whole sense of his investiture as king had been that he no longer a mere private person. The return of the bull should have stood for his really selfless submission to the functions of his role,”(15) he demonstrates how Minos has tried to make himself more powerful in a greedy and ruthless way. King Minos, in disrespecting Poseidon, lets his ego hurt himself and as a result, his whole kingdom. His selfishness makes him a cruel and cursed character. For instance, he feeds Athenian children to the Minotaur as treats. The Minotaur, created out of King Mino’s egoism, and the confusing labyrinth, symbolizes how one can be lost, and draw to acting selfish. King Minos should obeyed Poseidon, for the better of his people’s safety, and simply because Gods have supreme power. By disobeying Poseidon, King Minos selfishly thought only of himself, and consequently cursed himself and his people.
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