Kim Campbell

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  • Topic: Kim Campbell, Brian Mulroney, Prime minister
  • Pages : 2 (414 words )
  • Download(s) : 480
  • Published : January 15, 2012
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Personal life:
Kim Campbell was born  March 10, 1947  in Port Alberni, British Columbia,  Her mother left the family when she was 12, leaving Kim and her sister Alix, to her father. In high school she became the school's first female student president, and then graduated in 1964. After many years of university she settled down with Divinsky. Divorced 1983, then married Howard Eddy in 1986, divorced and common law married Hershey Felder. Biography:

 Kim Campbell ran in the 1988 federal election as a Progressive Conservative. She won and joined the cabinet, becoming Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development. She later became the first female Minister of Justice. She was then appointed as the first female Minister of National Defence after Mulroney shuffled his cabinet in 1993. But, in the same year Prime Minister Brian Mulroney retired and Kim Campbell became prime minister. Despite not being re-elected she was named women of the year in 1993, and continued to lecture about politics. Goals/accomplishments:

Kim Campbell’s goal was to become the prime minister of Canada and to create a successful democratic Canada. In a way she succeeded in becoming prime minister but because she had such a small term, she was not able to make any changes. Kim Campbell was part of many organizations, such as the international women’s forum and became the president of it in 2003 Importance:

Kim Campbell shows how women have been treated in the past in Canada, and how it is slowly changing over time. She had a huge impact on how we look at women in politics, she managed to rise to power when nobody figured she would. She was named women of the year because she was ahead of her time, in confidence to succeed in a situation where it was thought that only a man could. This was a huge step for women and Canada, a step toward full diversity. Opinion:

I feel that she was a failure in politics but she greatly succeeded in leaving a mark in Canadian history and women’s...
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