Katherines

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Smugglivus 2010 Feats of Strength: Thea reads An Abundance of Katherines by John Green By Thea On January 6, 2011 · 6 Comments · in 6 Rated Books, Book Reviews, Smugglivus The Feats of Strength are an integral part of our annual Smugglivus Tradition. In the Feats of Strength, we each dare each other to read a book that we know is so far beyond the other’s comfort zone as to put it in another galaxy altogether. It is more than a mere Dare – it is a Feat of Strength. Title: An Abundance of Katherines

Author: John Green
Genre: Contemporary YA
Publisher: Penguin USA
Publication Date: September 2006
Ebook: 272 Pages

When it comes to relationships, Colin Singleton’s type is girls named Katherine. And when it comes to girls named Katherine, Colin is always getting dumped. Nineteen times, to be exact. On a road trip miles from home, this anagram-happy, washedup child prodigy has ten thousand dollars in his pocket, a bloodthirsty feral hog on his trail, and an overweight, Judge Judy–loving best friend riding shotgun—but no Katherines. Colin is on a mission to prove The Theorem of Underlying Katherine Predictability, which he hopes will predict the future of any relationship, avenge Dumpees everywhere, and finally win him the girl. Love, friendship, and a dead Austro-Hungarian archduke add up to surprising and heart-changing conclusions in this ingeniously layered comic novel about reinventing oneself. Stand alone or series: Stand alone novel

How did I get this book: Bought
Why did I read this book: Ana luuuuuurves John Green (this was the first book of his that she had read and reviewed) and she made me do it. Smugglivus. Feat of Strength. You get the picture. Review:

So. I’ve made an important discovery – my own Colin/Archimedes style “Eureka!” Moment, if you will. But before I get there, let me start at the beginning.
The Beginning (or, The Story)
Ever since reading aloud a newspaper headline at the ripe age of two, Colin Singleton’s life has been defined by his status as a child prodigy. But Colin is a child prodigy that has grown up fearing that his prodigiousness will never reach fruition to true genius, and that he will never make an impact on the world (or, at least, he will never be famous). He also has suffered a pretty rough streak, dating-wise, having been dumped nineteen times by girls named Katherine. See, Colin’s particular brand of prodigy is obsessed with languages, codes and anagrams, and the name “Katherine” (spelled only this way, not with that nasty “C”) floats his boat; he’s only dated – and been dumped by – girls named Katherine. His last Katherine (Katherine the XIX) was his Great One, and after nearly a year of dating and furtive kisses in her basement and exchanging “I love you”s, Katherine XIX dumps a beleaguered Colin right after graduation – leaving him miserable, puking, and generally heartbroken. In order to gain some perspective and a measure of sanity, Colin agrees to a road trip with his best (and only) friend Hassan, a smart, funny dude who is perfectly content to sit on his parents’ couch and watch Judge Judy for the rest of his life (despite having been accepted – and deferring for a year – to university). The odd couple – a fat Arab kid (Hassan) and skinny former child prodigy with a Jew-fro (Colin) – hit the road, stopping in a small town called Gutshot, Tennessee when they inexplicably see a sign for the burial place of Archduke Franz Ferdinand (the slain Austro-Hungarian noble whose assassination sparked the first world war). It is here, in fair Gutshot, that An Abundance of Katherines lays our scene. Hired by an extroverted businesswoman named Hollis and her intriguing daughter Lindsey Lee, Colin and Hassan take a summer job interviewing elderly folks that have lived in Gutshot and worked at Hollis’s factory (which, interestingly enough, makes tampon strings). Here, Colin has his own Eurka Moment and works on his new theorem to predict the life cycle of a relationship – what...
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