Kaizen - Quality Control Technique

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Everyone is being exposed to the "zero defects" philosophy that establishes zero as a goal. This will not be achieved overnight but approached over time by continually striving to reduce targets. What kinds of techniques are needed to [pic] assure zero defects? What constitutes an out-of-control situation? An attributes control chart conveys little information at or near zero defects. Assuring zero defects through sampling inspection leads to infinite samples or 100 percent inspection, assuming 100 percent inspection efficiency (the latter rarely exists, and efficiency probably gets worse at lower defect levels). Obviously, some new approaches to quality control (QC) techniques will be necessary at zero defects. Total Quality Control is the most important inspection control of all in cases where, despite statistical quality control techniques or quality improvements implemented, sales decrease. If the original specification does not reflect the correct quality requirements, quality cannot be inspected or manufactured into the product. For instance, the parameters for a pressure vessel should include not only the material and dimensions, but also operating, environmental, safety, reliability, and maintainability requirements.

The company-wide quality approach places an emphasis on three aspects : - 1) Elements such as controls, job management, defined and well managed processes, performance and integrity criteria, and identification of records 2) Competence, such as knowledge, skills, experience, and qualifications 3) Soft elements, such as personnel integrity, confidence, organizational culture, motivation, team spirit, and quality relationships. The quality of the outputs is at risk if any of these three aspects is deficient in any way. There are four types of quality control techniques, they are as follows :- 1) Kanban

2) PokaYoke
3) Jidoka
4) Kaizen

Types of Quality Control Techniques: - The types of quality control techniques are as follows : ➢Kanban

Kanban is a concept related to lean and just in time (JIT) production. According to [pic][pic][pic]
Taiichi Ohno, the man credited with developing JIT, Kanban is a means through which JIT is achieved. The Japanese wordKanban is a common term meaning "signboard" or "billboard.” • E-Kanban systems

Many manufacturers have implemented electronic kanban systems. Electronic kanban systems, or E-Kanban systems, help to eliminate common problems such as manual entry errors and lost cards. E-Kanban systems can be integrated into enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. Integrating E- Kanban systems into ERP systems allows for real-time demand signaling across the supply chain and improved visibility. Data pulled from E-Kanban systems can be used to optimize inventory levels by better tracking supplier lead and replenishment times.

➢Poka Yoke
Poka yoke is a Japanese term that means mistake proofing. A Poka yoke device is one that prevents incorrect parts from being made or assembled, or easily identifies a flaw or error. Poka-yoke - 'mistake-proofing', a means of providing a visual or other signal to indicate a characteristic state. Often referred to as 'error-proofing', poke-yoke is actually the first step in truly error proofing a system. Error proofing is a manufacturing technique of preventing errors by designing the manufacturing process, equipment, and tools so that an operation literally cannot be performed incorrectly.


Autonomation describes a feature of machine design to affect the principle of jidoka used in the Toyota Production System (TPS) and Lean manufacturing. It may be described as "intelligent automation" or "automation with a human touch.” This type of automation implements some supervisory functions rather than production functions. At Toyota, this usually means that if an abnormal situation arises the machine stops and the worker will stop the production line....
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