Juvenile Crime Cjs/200

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Juvenile Crime Paper
Michael T. Baldwin Sr.
CJS/200
February 26, 2012
Jeff Gold

Juvenile Crime Paper

Most states have similar distinctions between adult courts and juvenile courts. Some of the differences are:
Adult courtJuvenile court
Bail hearingDetention hearing
TrialFact-finding hearing
Complaint or IndictmentPetition
DefendantRespondent
VerdictAdjudication
GuiltyDelinquent or involved
If a crime that is committed by a juvenile is a serious crime, such as murder or rape, if the juvenile is over the age of thirteen they can be tried in an adult court. Bail is usually not available for juveniles. They must prove to the courts that they are not a flight risk, nor a danger to the community. The general public is usually not allowed in the court room during juvenile proceedings as to protect the juvenile’s rights of being a minor. Juvenile cases are more informal than adult cases, some of the rules involved in court proceedings are not as strict as those of adult proceedings. Juveniles do not have a public trial by jury, they are not prosecuted for committing crimes, but rather delinquent acts. Once the court decides the penalty for the delinquent act then the juvenile could be sent away to a rehabilitation home or work camp. These homes are there for the rehabilitation of the juveniles so that they may enter back into society, hopefully never to return to the home. Sometimes they do and sometimes they don’t. Another type of penal correction is sort of a new one where the juvenile goes to boot camp. Officers put the juveniles through the same routine as if they were recruits that just joined the Army. This type of punishment instills discipline into the juveniles, so they may better themselves to go back into society.

Juvenile delinquency, also known as juvenile offending, or youth crime, is participation in illegal behavior by minors...
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