Justice vs. Mercy

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To be fair or to be just can be defined that one gets exactly what he or she deserves, not more, nor less. In King Lear, a play written by William Shakespeare, it can be easily observed that some individuals do not get what they deserve. Above all, forgiving someone is not always enough. Some individuals when forgiven for their crime without a punishment simply go right on to recommitting the same act again. Secondly, a sane individual who made his or her choice certainly has to be aware of the consequences that follow. If the individual, being aware of such consequences still decided to commit a wrongful act, no mercy but justice should be served. Finally, mercy should apply only to specific cases, while justice is equal in front of all. Although both justice and mercy are both needed in intervals in order for society to function properly, in my opinion, justice not mercy is the essential fundamental value to civilized human life. In some cases, individuals do not stop when forgiven – they move right back to recommitting wrongful acts. One that does not understand the wrongful of his doing will simply recommit the same crime or even move on to perform something worse, unless punished originally. Regan, one of Lear’s cruel daughters makes it seem like she does not have any limitations to her wicked actions. She pitilessly orders her husband Cornwall to rip out both of Gloucester’s eyes out of their sockets: “One side will mock another. Th’ other too.” (III vii 72). Although later in the same scene Cornwall is killed by one loyal servant, Regan shows no remorse for blinding Gloucester nor for her own husband’s death. Not punished for her actions, meaning she is yet again forgiven, Regan continues committing her evil deeds. As long as she gets what she wants, in this case Edmund, Regan will not stop at anything. From my perspective forgiving Regan by showing her mercy would be useless. Coming close to the end of the play, Regan is roughly punished when she is...
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