Julius Caesar- Paradoxal Mix of Good and Bad

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 1303
  • Published : November 28, 2010
Open Document
Text Preview
In act three, scene two from Shakespeare’s play, Julius Caesar, the main character Julius Caesar, is presented as a paradoxical mix of good and bad. Through the use of diction, figurative language, and tone it creates the image of Caesar. Too some Caesar is good, but too others Caesar is dreadful.

In scene two, from act three, the diction use creates a good and bad view of Caesar. At the beginning of the scene, Artemidorus insists that Caesar should read first the petition he has for him. Yet Caesar denies him and answers, “What touches us ourself shall be last served” (Act 3, scene 2, lines 17-18). The diction behind that illustrates Caesar as a good and bad person. He can be classified as good because by reading last what is at his fully convenience shows he cares about others. However, his action classifies as bad too since he conveys an arrogant attitude. Also, after denying the petition several times, Caesar answers to Artemidorus with a rhetorical question, “What is the fellow mad?” (Act 3, scene 2, line 20). Caesar ridicules Artemidorus’ insistence. Caesar does not literally mean if Artemidorus is mad, plus Caesar does not expect an answer, illustrating once again his disdainfulness, which is a bad image of Caesar. Later on, one reads about the begging of Metellus to Caesar for the return of his brother. Metellus tries to flatter Caesar by calling him the “most high, most mighty, and most puissant Caesar” (Act 3, scene 2, lines 58-59). The repetition of “most” in front of every word emphasize that Caesar is the only high, mighty and puissant person. The word “most” takes high, mighty and puissant into an extreme level of superiority. In instance, Caesar stops Metellus and tells him that he cannot be persuaded by the usage of pleasant words. Caesar tells Metellus that Metellus’ couching and lowly courtesies can convince “ordinary men” (Act 3, scene 2, line 64). Caesar depicts he is not like a normal man that lets himself be moved by emotions and that...
tracking img