Julius Caesar Essay

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 51
  • Published : February 4, 2015
Open Document
Text Preview
Raahul Marreddy 
Mr.Hanley 
Academic English 10 
December 5,2014 
 
 
The Great City of Rome 
 
As Benjamin Disraeli said, “Power has only one duty­to secure the social welfare of the  People.” This quote is most cases is true, like in the play​  Julius Caesa​
r. Power is shown “to 
secure the social welfare of the people” by Brutus’s Justification in killing Caesar, Caesar’s rule  and the conspirators killing Caesar.  
Brutus’s justification for killing Caesar shows that power had one duty in protecting and  securing the social welfare of the People. He says “If then that friend demand why Brutus rose  against Caesar, this is my answer: Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more.”  (III.ii.20­22). Brutus here says that he did not kill Caesar because he did not like him, but he put  Rome before Caesar in importance and thus killed Caesar for the better of Rome. Another  example is “Had you rather Caesar were living, and die all slaves, than that Caesar were dead, to  live all free men?”(III.ii.23­24). Even though nobody was a slave when Caesar was alive, Brutus  takes extra precaution because what he said could have happened so Brutus decided to kill  Caesar in order for the of Rome to remain free, which tells readers that Brutus did not kill out of  jealousy or for power but to make Rome the best it can be. The last example that supports 

Disraeli’s quote is “...as I slew my best lover for the good of rome, I have the same dagger for  myself, when it shall please my country to need my death.”(III.ii.45­47). Based on the quote,  Brutus is saying that he will kill himself when he finds it necessary for Rome if he becomes the  same as Caesar.  

Caesar’s rule or power also supports Disraeli’s quote because whatever Caesar does, it is  mostly for the good of the common people or the plebeians. Antony reads his will and says, “To  every Roman Citizen he gives / To every several men, seventy­five drachmas.”(III.iii.243­244). ...
tracking img