Julius Caesar Conflicting Perspectives Essay

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It seems that in the modern world and throughout history, we have been shrouded in conflicting perspectives. Everybody has a different point of view, a unique perspective and this is reflected heavily throughout most if not all literature. Further more, the conflicting perspectives often supply the text’s main interest and drama.

‘Julius Caesar’ by William Shakespeare and ‘Saving Private Ryan’ directed by Steven Spielberg are superlative examples of this, being riddled with conflicting perspectives and ideals. By using techniques such as symbolism, imagery and dialectical language throughout ‘Julius Caesar’, Shakespeare emphasizes these conflicts of interest between the characters and therefore extends the drama in the play. Steven Spielberg exploits the conflicting perspectives of the characters and the bigger picture of the opposing countries in World War 2 to create suspense, excitement and tension throughout the film. Spielberg skilfully uses a variety of camera angles, costume and lighting to make clear the perspectives and feelings of each protagonist and to differentiate between the ‘sides’ of the war. The main source of conflict in Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar is the difference in opinion between the conspirators and Caesar along with his supporters. Brutus, Cassius, Casca and Cinna, the main conspirators, believe that Julius Caesar’s agenda revolves around his hunger for power and that him becoming the emperor of Rome will be disastrous for the empire. The two tribunes, Flavius and Marullus share the conspirators’ opinion about Caesar and this is represented by Shakespeare in Act 1, Scene 1. The people of Rome are spread through the streets celebrating the return of Caesar to Rome. Flavius and Marullus, fearful of Caesar’s increasing power, disperse the crowd and lecture the commoners for their fickle loyalties reminding them that Caesar has conquered a fellow Roman, Pompey. This is evident in the quote: “And do you now strew flowers in his way that...
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