Julius Caesar Act 1

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ACT 1

Period 4
October 8,2012

Setting and Plot Act 1

Scene 1
Setting – The opening of Julius Caesar is set in a street, in Rome, after the feast of Luprical.
Analysis – The celebration is very important to the story and to the common people, because this is the 1st entrance of Caesar after conquering Pompey and winning what was the Civil War.
Plot – The actual scene shows workmen dressed in formal attire and celebrating Caesar. The most important dialogue in the scene is the two tribunes expressing their anger and points in which they disagree with Caesar because they strongly supported Pompey.

Scene 2
Setting – Scene 2 continues at the festival with Caesar walking through the town. In the middle of the scene the setting switches.
Analysis – This is important because in the first setting of the scene the soothsayer approaches Caesar telling him to “beware the Ides of March”. The second part of the scene Brutus and Cassius talk about Caesar’s power.

Plot – The plot of the second scene is very intense. The soothsayer warns Caesar, which Caesar plays off nicely in front of Rome’s common people. Although Caesar does not react to the Soothsayer in front of the people, on the inside he takes what the man said seriously. The second part of scene’s plot could be argued that it is the most important to the story, where Cassius persuades Brutus to think he would be a better leader then Caesar. Cassius goes above and beyond by writing the two names next to each other and crossing Caesar’s name out.

Scene 3
Setting – In scene three, the scene begins with a thunderstorm in the streets of Rome. The Two characters Cassius and Casca are alone talking in a dark ally way.
Analysis – This is a crucial setting to the story because that was where Caesars death was partially plotted. Also Cassius and Casca plot how to involve Brutus. The thunderstorm is also important to the analysis because it is a symbol in the story that the conspirators thought was a sign that Caesar will be dethroned.

Plot – The plot of scene three is completely focused on Cassius and Casca’s conversation involving Brutus and Caesar.

Quotes Act 1
Act I. Scene ii. Line 21.
Soothsayer is speaking to Ceaser.
"Beware the Ides of March"
Analysis: Translation- "Beware of March 15"
This quote is when the soothsayer warns Ceaser to beware of March 15th, something bad is going to happen. Cassius, Brutus and the other men are going to kill Ceaser on March 15th. This is important because Ceaser is a little superstitious but pushes the soothsayer aside and ignores him.

Act I. Scene ii. Line 151-154.
Cassius is speaking to Brutus.
"'Brutus' and 'Ceaser.' What should be in that 'Ceaser?' Why should that name be sounded more than yours? Write them together: yours is as fair a name.' Analysis: Translation- "'Brutus' and 'Ceaser.' What's so special about 'Ceaser'? Why should that name be proclaimed more than yours? Write them together- yours is just as good a name." This quote means that Ceaser and Brutus are equal. Saying that Brutus is just as good if not greater man. This is important because it is when Cassius begins to convince Brutus to get rid of Ceaser.

Act I. Scene ii. Line 250-256.
Casca is speaking to Brutus and Cassius.
"I saw Marc Antony offer him a crown- yet t'was not a crown neither, t'was one of the cornets- and, as I told you, he put it by once. But for all that, to my thinking, he would fain have had it. Then he offered it to him again; then he put it by again; but to my thinking, he was very loath to lay his fingers off it." Analysis: Translation- "I saw Marc Antony off him a crown- though it wasn't a real crown, just a small circlet- and, as I told you, he refused it once- though in my opinon he would've liked to have it. Then Antony offered it to him again, and he refused it again (though, in my opinion, he was reluctant to take his hand off it.)" This quote means that Ceaser refused the crown that would...
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