Julius Caesar

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Julius Caesar

“Julius Caesar accomplished many things, other than his usual victories in wars against other empires (Achievements of Julius Caesar 1).” He was an orator, a historian, a statesman, a lawgiver, and an army general. Although he was greatly influenced by Greece, he himself left a huge impact on the Mediterranean world. Julius Caesar, famous for conquering Gaul, or modern day France, was the victim of one of the most famous assassinations in history. Before his assassination on March 15, 44 BC, he was one the most influential leaders in history due to his use of military power, political power, and influence to directly affect Rome and history.

Gaius Julius Caesar, born July 13, 100, was the son of Gaius Caesar and Aurelia, but was said to be the descendant of Romulus, the supposed first Roman king, and the goddess Venus. In 92 BC, Caesar’s father was elected praetor in Asia Minor, which would have placed young Caesar out of Italy around the time the Social War started (Lendering 1). The year 85 BC was not a good year for Julius Caesar, his father had died and he himself had been sentenced to execution for refusing to divorce his wife, of which he went into hiding until his political friends and family got him a pardon. During Caesar’s lifetime, he was ordered to be put to death for refusing to divorce his wife, and was taken by pirates on two separate occasions. After arriving back to Rome in 79 BC, he was in a military legate where he was awarded the civic crown for saving the life of a citizen. After being awarded that he was sent on an embassy to obtain a fleet of ships from King Nicomedes of Bithynia later in 78 BC, he returned to Rome and started a career as a lawyer (McManus 3). Julius Caesar was assassinated on the ides of March, or March 15, 44 BC, by, on most accounts, twenty-three of his colleagues in the senate under a statue of Pompey ("Ides of March Marked ..." 1). Caesar’s colleagues murdered him because they believed...
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