Judges are elected or selected within each state and each state has levels of judication

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Judges are elected or selected within each state and each state has levels of judication. From the district courts to the appeals court, judges are needed for each court system. There is also a structure in place for electing or selecting federal judges. Your individual work is to complete the following:

Describe the six (6) different ways in which judges are selected based on the different court systems Using a word processing program, prepare a document that follows APA guidelines and includes:
There are 6 different ways in which judges are selected.
1. Legislative Appointment
2. Executive Appointment
3. Nonpartisan Election
4. Partisan Election
5. Merit selection
6. Appointment
Legislative Appointment – South Carolina and Virginia are the only 2 states that have maintained this process of judicial selection, in which the legislature has the only power for appointing judges. In South Carolina, the state has established a ten member Judicial Merit Selection Commission consisting of both legislators and citizens to screen applicants and make references to the legislature. Executive Appointment – Today there are 3 states (California, Maine, and New Jersey) that use the executive method for judicial selection. In the state of California the candidate must be chosen by a three member Commission on judicial appointments. Initially, many states implemented the federal model of judicial selection, although the executive would appoint judges, subject to legislative confirmation. In Maine and New Jersey, the governor’s nominee must be confirmed by six members of the state Senate. Among the states that use contested elections to choose judges, twenty-eight authorize the governor to appoint judges to fill mid-term vacancies. These appointments are often only for unexpired terms and are therefore outside the formal selection process, but they still provide opportunities for political control by the executive, with appointees realizing the advantages of term....