John F. Kennedy Assassination

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JFK Assasination Paper
"I suppose really the only two dates that most people remember where they were was Pearl Harbor and the death of President Franklin Roosevelt." --John F. Kennedy

The assassination of John F. Kennedy, the thirty-fifth President of the United States, took place on Friday, November 22, 1963, in Dallas, Texas, at 12:30 p.m. in Dealy Plaza. America changed that day. It has never been the same since that day and never will be. Who really shot Kennedy? It has always been a question asked by people all over the world. I think that the United States government knows the truth and they have always hid the truth of what really happened that day. As long as the government can make most of us believe one thing, the rest of us will have to wait for the truth to be told. There have only been two official investigations on the JFK assassination. One concluded that Oswald acted alone, the other that there was a conspiracy. After forty-four years, many of the key documents which could tell the whole story remain classified and untold. John F. Kennedy’s brain is still missing from the National Archives. Why, if it’s an open and shut case? Why is everything so private, if Oswald supposedly acted by himself? Did Lee Harvey Oswald kill John Kennedy by himself, or was there a conspiracy?

One of the things that were taken into consideration was the “Single Bullet Theory”. The Single Bullet Theory or also known as The Magic Bullet theory was brought into the United States by Warren Commission to explain that three shots fired by single gun-man Lee H. Oswald resulted in the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. It was brought up by Warren Commissioner staff member Arlen Specter who is now the Senator of Pennsylvania. He stated that a single bullet known as “Warren Commission Exhibit 399” caused the non-fatal wounds shown in both President Kennedy and Texas Governor John Connally. He also stated that the fatal wound to the head was caused by a bullet other than this so-called “Single Bullet”. According to the single-bullet theory, a three-centimeter-long copper-jacketed lead-core 6.5-millimeter rifle bullet fired from the sixth floor of the Texas School Book Depository passed through President Kennedy’s neck, Governor Connally’s chest, wrist, and embedded itself in the Governor’s thigh. If so, this bullet destroyed 15 layers of clothing, 7 layers of skin, and about 15 inches of tissue. It then had to strike a necktie knot, remove 4 inches of rib, and shatter a radius bone. The bullet was later found on a stretcher at the Parkland Memorial Hospital, in Dallas after the assassination. The Warren Commission found that the stretcher was the one that carried John Connally. This bullet became one of the main Commission exhibits known as CE 399. In fact the Warren Commission was wrong; Connally was not even carried on that stretcher. The outer coating of the bullet found on the stretcher was not destroyed. The bullet’s nose appeared normal; the tail was pressed tightly together on one side. In conclusion, the Warren Commission found just enough persuasive evidence to show that a “single bullet” caused the President’s neck wound and every wound in Connally. Some of the Commission members disagreed with this, but there is no doubt that shots came from the sixth floor of the depository building. Most people that did not believe in conspiracy believed that the Single Bullet theory is just the Warren Commission’s conclusion that Oswald acted alone. The reason for this is timing: if JFK was wounded some time between frame 210 and 225 of the Zapruder Film and Connally was hit sometime no later than the 240 frame there would not have been enough time between the shots for Oswald to fire two shots from his rifle. The FBI told Warren Commission that Oswald’s rifle would not have been able to be reloaded, aimed and re-fired in less than 2.3 seconds or about 42 frames.

Another thing that could be taken into...
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