John F. Kennedy

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s): 58
  • Published: January 21, 2013
Read full document
Text Preview
Outline
John F. Kennedy was the 35th president of the United States of America. He is known for his strong beliefs. He was a president for exactly 1000 days and during that time he became one of the most enduring presidents in the history of the United States. John F. Kennedy will be remembered as a hero and a visionary politician who, if not for his untimely death, may have averted the political and social turmoil of the late 1960s. 1.Early Life

2.Family
a.Parents
3.Education
4.Marriage
5.Before he was President
a.Military
6.Journey to be President
7.Presidency
a.Challenges
8.Accomplishments
9.Why he’s Remembered
10.Death
a.Effects of his death
11.Conclusion


John Fitzgerald Kennedy (JFK) was born on May 29, 1917 at 83 Beals Street in Brookline, Massachusetts. He was the second son of Joseph P. Kennedy, Sr. and Rose Fitzgerald. His elder brother's name was Joe. He had eight siblings, three brothers and five sisters. His maternal grandfather, John "Honey Fitz" Fitzgerald was a political figure in Boston (the Mayor of Boston). JFK was given his grandfather's name. During childhood, everyone called him Jack. He spent the first ten years of his life in Massachusetts, the town where he was born. (JOHN F. KENNEDY PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY AND MUSEUM) John Fitzgerald Kennedy was the offspring of two families whose roots stretched back to Ireland. The Fitzgerald family was from the rural County Limerick village of Bruff in western Ireland. Between 1846 and 1855 some of the Fitzgerald’s migrated to America because of the devastating Potato Famine that was affecting their livelihood. During that same period of time, Patrick Kennedy, a cooper, left his home in Dunganstown, County Wexford for the United States. In 1849 he married Bridget Murphy in East Boston. Nine years after they got married Patrick passed away and left Bridget, with four small children, the youngest of them, Patrick Joseph "P.J.", would become John Kennedy's grandfather. (JOHN F. KENNEDY PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY AND MUSEUM)

John Kennedy’s parents, Joseph Kennedy and Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy, were both members of politically prominent Irish Catholic families in Boston. Joseph Kennedy bought the nine-room, Colonial Revival style house at 83 Beals Street in Brookline, a streetcar suburb of Boston, shortly before his marriage to Rose Fitzgerald in 1914. John Fitzgerald Kennedy was born in the master bedroom, on the second floor, in May 1917 and spent the formative years of his childhood in this middle-class neighborhood. Here Rose Kennedy instilled in her children a commitment to personal cultivation and public service with piano lessons in the parlor, political discussions around the dinner table, and edifying tales of adventure in the nursery. The live-in maids accomplished most of the physical labor in the household, allowing the Kennedys’ to lavish time and attention on their growing family. In 1920, with the birth of their fourth child, Rose and Joseph Kennedy felt that the family had outgrown the Beals Street house and moved nearby to a larger home, where they lived until they departed for New York in 1927. (Buzzle)

Despite his father's constant reprimands, young Kennedy was a poor student and a mischievous boy. He attended a Catholic boys' boarding school in Connecticut called Canterbury. At the school he excelled at English and history, which were the subjects he enjoyed the most, but nearly flunked Latin, in which he had no interest. Despite his poor grades, Kennedy continued on to Choate, an elite Connecticut preparatory school. Although he was obviously brilliant – evidenced by the extraordinary thoughtfulness and nuance of his work on the rare occasions when he applied himself—Kennedy remained at best a mediocre student, preferring sports, girls and practical jokes over schoolwork. (NPS) Jacqueline, JFK’s wife, started her first job in the fall of 1951 as the "Inquiring Camera Girl"...
tracking img