John Proctor, the Tragic Hero

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 234
  • Published : September 8, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
In The Crucible by Arthur Miller, John Proctor is a tragic hero with the flaw that is committing adultery with Abigail. He soon realizes all his mistakes and confess all his sin and meets a death. He represents his individual freedom more than anyone else throughout the book while the Salem court and the Puritan theocracy represent repression of individual freedom. The start of the witchcraft causes chaos to the town, church, and the court instead of bringing peace to a community. The Salem rules over and overpowers the individual freedom of people in the town while John Proctor continue to keep his individual freedom. John Proctor represents an individual freedom when he stands up for the people who are accused for involving in a witchcraft. In the end of the book, he refuses to sign the confession because he does not want his name to be on the confession since he is innocent. ”Because it is my name! Because I cannot have another in my life! Because I lie and sign myself to lies! Because I am not worth the dust on the feet of them that hang! How may I live without my name? I have given you my soul; leave me my name!” (Miller, 143). He is the first person to deny to sign the confession instead of lying to the court. He believes and does not give up his self and freedom. He also shows his freedom by confessing his sin. “How do you call Heaven! Whore! Whore!” (Miller, 109). He commits that he had an affair with Abigail and calls her a liar for trying to kill his wife. Proctor confess in order to save his wife and show The Salem and the Puritan theocracy show repression of individual freedom. The Salem gets strict as the court goes on and takes away people’s freedom. If people does not follow the court orders, the court assumes that they are involve in Devil. That leads to stoned to death like Giles or hanged. "In that case, I have no choice but to arrest you for contempt of this court, do you know that?” (Miller, 97). Judge Danforth is making Giles to tell the...
tracking img