Job Analysis for Warehousing Supervisor

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Job Analysis for Warehousing Supervisor

Mike M. Moore

August 6, 2010

HR508: Employee Staffing Training & Development

City University of Seattle

The warehouse is the core logistics activity that cannot be entirely automated away, or at least not in the near future, despite improvements of technology and inventory managements systems. In response to these innovations, warehouse employees' jobs are changing to incorporate more encompassing duties once associated with other logistics activities, such as purchasing, inventory control, and customer service. Specifically, warehouse supervisors need detailed knowledge of operating tasks along with significant management skills. Warehouse supervisors' jobs now span organizational levels, and are critical to the successful performance of the entire businesses’ logistics and warehouse operations. These changes alter the way firms hire, train, and develop warehouse supervisors. They demand more education, better training, and frequently updated training for the people who take these critical jobs. What firms once neglected or left to chance must now be managed carefully so that these critical members of the logistics team can deliver effective, efficient warehouse performance. These are the people who oversee all aspects of operations. Purpose of Job Analysis

To better understand these changes, for evaluating and assessing current and future job requirements and training needs, a job analysis will be performed. A job analysis is the process of studying jobs in order to gather, analyze, synthesize, and report information about job requirements (Heneman, 2009). The information collected in a job analysis lists the duties, responsibilities, necessary skills, qualifications, outcomes, reporting relationship and work environment of a particular job. Ultimately, it is about the position rather than individual currently holding the position. In this particular case, this will be accomplished through experience, interviews and additional occupational references to put the job classification findings into a broader context. This paper will focus on the growth and development of one job family—warehouse supervisors. The following is the job analysis for a warehouse supervisor: [pic] Job Title:                 Warehouse Manager

Classification:           Full Time Employee
Department/Division:  Logistics/ Supply
Location:                 Various Inventory Control Points Pay Grade:               Supervisor (Salary + Performance Bonuses)

Job requirements
A. Summary of Position
Warehouse supervisors are burdened with the difficult task of working in the difficult middle. They need to know about supplier and customer procedures that may affect warehouse operations.  This is extremely important in the more efficient demand-based supply management chain. Warehouse supervisors must know everything pertaining to the warehouse operating and clerical jobs. It’s a completely encompassing position that requires a high level supervisory skills, training skills, and interpersonal skills. They must not only manage, but they often do the work of operating and performing the duties and tasks of employees. These jobs are complex, calling for frequent decisions and almost constant activity. They supervise up to 60 employees, frequently attend meetings to help with human resources decisions, and chair meetings to schedule work, resolve conflicts, and informally exchange information.  B. Job Duties

Administrative (40% of time consumption):
1) Receive and process internal orders to supply material for customer orders or stock replenishment. 2) Inventory processing and correction of inventory discrepancies 3) Performs routine and regular follow ups with suppliers 4) Performs requisitioning or procurement functions for stock replenishments 5) Provide status of orders to customers

6) Maintain safety and...
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