Job Analysis and Design

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Introduction
Below you find the steps we have taken for a Job Analysis and making it into a position description, the legal requirements, and what elements are included in the position. We will also explain how position descriptions are used to recruit, select and manage an employee’s performance. Lastly, we will create the actual position description for our administrative assistant position. After hard work from our current employees and management we have concluded this process. The Process for Turning a Job Analysis into a Position Description

Last week, I sent out surveys and questionnaires pertaining to our new position being developed for an Administrative Assistant. With hard work and commitment we have discovered a way to turn our job analysis into a position description. I gathered up what all the terms mean within the job description. The terms included are job, position, responsibilities, duties, and tasks. I wrote the best job description basics down to include the following: Job Title, Job Summary, Key responsibilities, Minimum job requirements, Physical requirements, and a disclaimer. The title accurately reflects the type of work to be performed. It also indicates the level of work being performed. Keep in mind you never want to exaggerate a job title. I also made sure there were no discriminating job titles that refer to age, gender, or race. I avoided any demeaning job titles, and considered if the job title will be used in more than one department. For example we are looking for an “Accounting” Administrative Assistant. The next step I took was to create a job summary. I was sure to put an accurate description of Accounting Administrative Assistant. I described the primary reason for and the function of the job. I included an overview of the job and also introduced the job responsibilities. The job summary describes the job without detailed task descriptions. The key responsibilities of the job are the requirements that the applicant performs. I just listed the basic aspects and primary responsibilities. I listed 7 requirements for the position. It is recommended to use 7 to 10 responsibilities, depending on the job. I listed the higher-level responsibilities because the minor tasks provide too much detail.

I listed the minimum job requirements. These include knowledge, skills, and abilities that are required to perform this job. I was sure to check over the education, experience, special skills, and any certifications or licenses the applicant may have. I feel this is important in the requirements because if the person is not educated enough, they will not succeed in our company.

Physical Requirements describes the physical demands and environment for the job. I listed the basic physical conditions needed to perform. The applicant is not required to lift any heavy objects so that doesn’t need listed. But in some positions it is required but not for the specific position.

I also included a disclaimer. The purpose for the disclaimer is to insure the applicant is clearly informed that the job summary is only a summary! It is the typical functions of the job, not a complete list of all responsibilities, tasks, and duties. Those responsibilities, tasks, and duties may differ from the outline.

Another important part of turning a job analysis into a position description is having another team member of management read of the summary. I, myself, passed this along to my superior. He approved it and sent it to the Accounting Manager who then read over it. With both of their approvals I felt confident in the position description. http://www.hr-guide.com/data/G000.htm

http://www.unisa.edu.au/hrm/employment/remuneration/job_analysis.asp

The Legal Requirements for Position Descriptions
As in anything I do for our company, I am always cautious of our legal requirements. In writing this position description I avoided any discrimination. It is...
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