Jetblue Case Study About 10 Pages

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JetBlue Airways Case Study Analysis

Problem Definition

The situation described in “JetBlue Airways: Regaining Altitude” is one that,

unfortunately, more than a few people have experienced. The many problems that unfolded in

the course of only a few short days, were all caused by one main issue, a lack of communication

and communication training in a crisis situation.

Company Objectives

What once was a vision has now become a reality that defines JetBlue as a company.

Neeleman envisioned the ultimate flying experience for his customers.

Every seat would come equipped with a television that featured dozens of free channels

provided by satellite signal. Finally, to keep costs down, JetBlue would offer a virtually

unlimited supply of appealing in-flight snacks instead of soggy meals that no one really

wanted. (Argenti, 2009, p.100)

It is obvious that David Neeleman and JetBlue set out to exceed customer satisfaction and in

general, tend to go above and beyond what the average airline has to offer. However, it seems

that their goal of excellent customer service was higher in importance than teaching their

employees how to communicate in emergency situations, such as the one presented to us in the

case study. It is essential for companies to find a competitive advantage to set themselves apart

from other companies in their industry, however it is also crucial for these companies to find a

balance and continue to value the basic fundamentals of communication.

Data Analysis

JETBLUE AIRWAYS CASE STUDY ANALYSIS

JetBlue went from startup company to powerhouse of the sky in 2007 with overall growth

in terms of destination and size. Run by CEO David Neeleman’s expertise and experience in the

industry, the company boasted in customer satisfaction and provided practical and luxury

amenities to all passengers. “Neeleman envisioned treating JetBlue’s customers…to comfy

leather seats, paperless ticketing, and exceptional service by flight crew members” (Argenti,

2009, p.100). Soon after 9/11 JetBlue and airlines worldwide went through mandatory alterations

in order to comply with safety demands and hypersensitive flying customers. In the months

following the horrific event “only three airlines managed to turn a profit…-the low-cost carriers

Southwest, AirTran, and JetBlue” (Argenti, 2009, 100). In the following years the bond between

customer and airline continued to strengthen. JetBlue seemed to be at the top of its career,

ranking “highest in customer satisfaction among low-cost airlines in 2006 and among all major

airlines in the United States in 2005” (Argenti, 2009, p.99). The size and continuity of the

JetBlue brand helped it endure changing markets and adapt to demands set by the industry.

It seemed JetBlue could do no wrong until winter weather conditions got the best of them

on Valentine’s Day 2007. Officials at JetBlue made a false accusation that the winter storm

weather forecast would change. After the break in the storm failed to appear and the company

declined to make cancellations they ended up paying for it in reputation, integrity, and

reimbursement vouchers. With planes backed up from all directions, passengers, luggage and

cargo were stuck for 6-9 hours. Some customers waited to board planes that would soon be

cancelled, while others waited for a take-off that would never happen. JetBlue failed to

effectively communicate the message to the customers. According to Argenti, “Nine of the

airline’s jets sat idle on the tarmac for more than six hours before passengers were successfully

JETBLUE AIRWAYS CASE STUDY ANALYSIS

offloaded and taken to the terminal” (Argenti, 2009, p.101). Things continued to get worse on

the days following this heart breaking system failure.

On February 15, airport personnel had to call police to help control the crowd at Newark

Liberty International Airport....
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