Jetblue Case Study

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Running
 Head:
 HUMAN
 RESOURCES
 MANAGEMENT
 AT
 JETBLUE
 
 
 

1
 
 

Human Resources Management Analysis JetBlue Airways Case Study: JetBlue Airways: Starting from Scratch (Gittell & O’Reilly, 2001)

Running
 Head:
 HUMAN
 RESOURCES
 MANAGEMENT
 AT
 JETBLUE 2
 
 
 
 
  Abstract
 
  This
 paper
 identifies
 the
 various
 impacts
 of
 Equal
 Employment
 Opportunity
  (EEO)
 laws
 on
 JetBlue
 Airways
 and
 the
 strategic
 and
 operational
 goals
 as
 they
  pertain
 to
 the
 human
 resources
 perspectives
 in
 the
 case
 study
 JetBlue
 Airways:
  Starting
 from
 Scratch
 (Gittell
 &
 O’Reilly,
 2001).
 
 
 

Running
 Head:
 HUMAN
 RESOURCES
 MANAGEMENT
 AT
 JETBLUE
 
 
  JetBlue
 Airways:
 A
 Strategic
 Human
 Resources
 Overview
 
  Ann
 Rhoades,
 former
 head
 of
 human
 resources
 for
 Southwest
 Airlines,
 

3
 
 

became
 the
 driving
 force
 behind
 the
 JetBlue
 startup
 human
 resources
 strategy
 in
  1999.
 The
 airline
 was
 started
 with
 more
 venture
 capital
 funding
 than
 any
 airline
 in
  history
 by
 David
 Neeleman,
 former
 executive
 vice
 president
 for
 Southwest
 Airlines,
  to
 build
 a
 fleet
 that
 could
 serve
 ‘under-­‐serviced’
 destinations
 at
 affordable
 rates,
  with
 the
 best
 service
 and
 technology
 in
 the
 industry.
 Not
 stopping
 there,
 Neeleman
  also
 wanted
 to
 create
 a
 company
 culture
 never
 seen
 before
 at
 any
 airline
 -­‐
 or
 by
  most
 any
 other
 company
 in
 America.
  Rhoades’
 idea
 was
 to
 build
 human
 resources
 policy
 based
 on
 core
 ‘values’.
 
  With
 a
 new
 challenge
 ahead,
 she
 was
 able
 to
 create
 a
 unique
 hiring
 process
 and
  employment
 guidelines
 that
 were
 built
 on
 customer-­‐centric
 ideals
 as
 well
 as
 group-­‐ based
 compensation.
 This
 benchmark
 system
 would
 become
 the
 central
 strategy
 in
  the
 airline’s
 mission
 to
 become
 ‘the
 best
 place
 to
 work
 in
 town’
 (Gittell
 &
 O’Reilly,
  2001,
 p.
 10).
 
  Equal
 Employment
 Opportunity
 (EEO)
 Laws
 and
 their
 Impact
 on
 JetBlue
 
  The
 most
 important
 EEO
 law
 impacting
 JetBlue
 is
 Title
 VII
 of
 the
 Civil
 Rights
  Act
 of
 1964,
 which
 was
 amended
 by
 the
 Civil
 Rights
 Act
 of
 1991,
 prohibiting
  employment
 discrimination
 based
 on
 race,
 color,
 religion,
 sex,
 or
 national
 origin.
  The
 1991
 amendment
 reversed
 Supreme
 Court
 decisions,
 which
 previously
 limited
  the
 rights
 of
 people
 protected
 by
 the
 law
 and
 it
 also
 provided
 additional
 protections
  for
 intentional
 discriminations,
 punitive
 damages,
 and
 attorney’s
 fees
 (U.S.
 Equal
  Employment
 Opportunity
 Commission,
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