Jet Blue

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An Airline for the People
Management Accounting
02/27/2013

An Airline for the People
JetBlue Airlines has a short but overall successful history in air travel. According to the “Customer Protection” page of their website (2012), their goal is, and always has been, “bringing humanity back to air travel.” JetBlue values its strong company culture, as described on their “Work Here” website page (n.d.), and its communication structure encourages upward and downward communication, which lessens the power gap within the organization. JetBlue works with many different third party companies and vendors to procure the goods and services that JetBlue customers have grown accustomed to; such as the roomy Airbus A320s. There have been lapses in JetBlue’s communication ethics; however, their major mistakes seem to be few and far between. Their strong leadership is likely the reason that they have such a short list of mishaps. JetBlue’s entire culture is based on excellent customer service, and they carefully select their team accordingly (JetBlue, 2012). History

JetBlue is a young airline, compared to its competitors. According to JetBlue’s online History webpage (n.d.), it was founded in February of 1999 by David Neeleman, as “New Air.” The focus of Neeleman’s vision was to bring customer service back to the air, hence his decision to install televisions at each seat, making JetBlue the first airline to provide live satellite television to their customers (Mount, 2004). JetBlue’s online History webpage (n.d.) states that in February of 2000, JetBlue took off on its very first flight from its hub at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK), down to Fort Lauderdale, FL. Over the course of this year, JetBlue added 10 service destinations to their itinerary and, on December 21, 2000, flew their one millionth customer. Then, just four months later, they flew their two millionth customer (JetBlue - History, n.d.). This fledgling airline continued to grow rapidly, adding more aircraft to its fleet and adding service destinations. Then on March 4, 2005, they received the FAA’s Diamond Certificate of Excellence Award for their focus on safety training (JetBlue - History, n.d.). That same year, in keeping up with technology and providing convenience to their customers, they introduced JetBlue Getaways which allowed travelers to go to one internet site to plan their vacations; JetBlue also began online flight and baggage check-ins. Then in May, 2007 David Barger became JetBlue’s President and CEO, replacing David Neeleman (JetBlue - History, n.d.) after the Valentine’s Day incident of 2007, which will be discussed shortly. This event prompted JetBlue’s decision to introduce the JetBlue Customer Bill of Rights, which was the first of its kind in the airline industry (JetBlue, 2007). Over the years, JetBlue became the official airline for the Boston Red Sox, the New York Jets, Boston College Athletics, and the Florida Panthers (JetBlue - History, n.d.). They continue to upgrade their customers’ amenities, such as more leg room and more entertainment options. Since its inception, JetBlue has been a flourishing airline focused on their customers. Mission

Rather than having a traditional mission statement, JetBlue offers its customers a promise; that they are committed to “bringing humanity back to air travel” (JetBlue, 2012). Winning the J.D. Power and Associates award for “Highest in Customer Satisfaction Among Low Cost Carriers” (JetBlue - Awards, n.d.) seven years in a row serves as proof that JetBlue has and continues to keep their promise. In doing so, they operate on five core values; safety, caring, integrity, fun, and passion (JetBlue - More to Look Forward to, n.d.). Their employees believe in these values and it shows through the success of JetBlue. In keeping with their strong focus on values and customer service, JetBlue advertises, “JetBlue – You above all.” This double entendre conveys to the...
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