Jean Watson's Caring Theory

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 679
  • Published : February 11, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
The Implementation of Jean Watson's Caring Theory in Nursing UTHSCSA

The Implementation of Jean Watson’s Caring Theory in Nursing Dr. Jean Watson defined nursing as a “Human science of persons and human health-illness experiences that are mediated by professional, personal, scientific, esthetic, and ethical human“(Watson, 1988, p. 54). The Caring Theory of Nursing is a relational caring for self and others based on a moral, ethical, and philosophical foundation of love and values (Watson Caring Science Institute, 2010). Watson‘s core concepts formulate the practice of loving-kindness, enabling the authentic presence of deep belief and cultivating one’s own spiritual practice towards’ wholeness (Butts & Rich, 2011). This is better worded as a holistic approach to mind, body, spirit, and beyond the ego which releases the “being’ in the caring healing environment allowing miracles to flow from the openness of the unexpected (Watson Caring Science Institute, 2010). The major elements allow the nursing world to take focus on Carative factors, grasp onto transpersonal caring relationships, and in doing so provide what is known as a critical “caring moment”(Watson Caring Science Institute, 2010). The caring theory and tools are practiced in every aspect of nursing in today’s modern medical world and are supported by ethical research that celebrates the healing environment. Watson truly applied a clinical practice that has grown the nursing world into a genuine and loving atmosphere for the sick, lamed, and broken. The Components of Human Caring Theory (Jean Watson)

The human caring theory birthed by Dr. Jean Watson derived from a solid background founded in education counseling, nursing and psychology (Butts & Rich, 2011). Watson’s theory took shape around 1979, as a response to wide gap she witnessed in health care, which was technology oriented and simply focused on diagnosis and treatment of disease overlooking the art of healing recognizing humanity as a whole and scope of individual relation between patient and health care provider (“Jean Watson’s theory of Human Care”, 2010). Watson was motivated to write the theory as she pursued to develop an integrated baccalaureate curriculum in a school of nursing (Butts & Rich, 2011). Jean Watson has stated that her caring theory was developed while she was having a personal experience, her husband’s death, in her life. She molded her professional and personal life in order to develop her theory. According to Jean Watson’s definition of metaparadigm, a person is a human being whose needs should be respected, supported, and cared for. The environment should be contributing to holistic healing. Health was examined by Watson holistically, where a human being should be able to function mentally, physically, spiritually, and socially to its full aptitude (Jean Watson, 1988). Watson’s theory was developed on a foundational approach which focused on both deductive and inductive methods. The inductive approach was set out to prove theory through research and in contrast the deductive approach was developed based on experience (Tomey and Alligood, 2006). The central theme of the caring theory is allowing an individual to encompass their approach to nursing through loving-kindness and equanimity (Watson Caring Science Institute, 2010). Major elements in this theory according to Watson are the carative factors, the transpersonal caring relationship, and the caring occasion or caring moment. It is said that “Jean Watson is one of the few nursing theorists who considers not only the cared for but the caregiver”, which is supported by her core concepts of the caring theory (Tomey and Alligood, 2006). Carative factors are considered the guide of the nursing core which attempt to honor all human dimensions. The nurse’s work and the intimate world are idiosyncratic experiences of the individuals they serve and contrast the curative factors of...
tracking img