Japanese Internment Camp

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“December 7th 1941 – a date which will live in infamy –.” The United States was suddenly and deliberately attacked by Japanese navel and air forces at Pearl Harbor. After Pearl Harbor was attacked, President Franklin Delono Roosevelt signed executive order 9066 authorizing the secretary of War to designate parts of the country as “military areas” from which any and all persons might be excluded, and in which travel restrictions might be imposed. The Japanese Americans were soon forced into relocation camps around the country. The evacuation affected over 200,000 Japanese Americans. However, there were no valid reasons with interning Japanese Americans during World War II. There was a fear of sabotage from Japanese Americans or Japanese nationals posing as Japanese American citizens. There was a poster of the time that informs people in the service to not divulge information concerning troop movement in the United States and elsewhere because anyone around could be a spy for the enemy and eavesdrop. This poster of the time was an invalid reason for interning Japanese Americans during World War II because according to Francis Biddle, “ My last last advice from the War Department is that there is no evidence of imminent attack and from the F.B.I. That there is no evidence of planned sabotage.” There was an intent of special interests to acquire land and businesses owned by Japanese Americans. According to an article in the San Francisco news, “Nearly one – third of the Japanese farmlands on the Pacific Coast have been transferred to new owners” This article in the San Francisco news was an invalid reason for interning Japanese Americans during World War II because when they transferred the farms to new owners they basically unjustly stole the land from Japanese and gave it to new operators in which most new operators were Angelo. There was a rationalization that Japanese Americans need to be sent in internment camps for their own protection. According to Mike J....
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