Japan Cotton Cloth Production

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The cotton and cloth production in Japan has greatly increased. Japan is hiring more and more workers preferably females workers. The women don’t get paid the first year, says the older sister of Aki (Document 3). Most of the entire factory workers were farmers; they went to work in the factories to make more money for their families’ (Document 5). “For the last few decades there has been a rapid decline of hand woven cloth”, (Document 6) this just shows you that machines are taking over the cotton and cloth industry.

In order for this industry to keep a steady pace of production, it needs workers. Many of these people are working in poor conditions. In Document 3, Aki the younger sister was sent home due to an illness; sadly two days later she died. This goes to show that disease spreads like a wild fire, in these factories. British Royal Commission of Labour says “The average worker remains in the same factory for less than two years”, this because wages are low (Document 9).

In Indian 1909 22.1% of workers were female in Indian, and in Japan 1920 80% were female workers. Over the next 25 years India’s female workers percentage dropped to only 18.9% where as, Japan increased its female workers by 0.6% in the previous 10 years (Document 7).

Radhakamal Mukerjee an Indian economist says “The local textile industry owes its very existence, promotions, and growth to the enterprising spirit of native bankers and investors, who invest large capital as shareholders, investors, and financiers” (Document 6). Where as, I think the company should thank the workers who worked there butts metaphorically speaking. If you think about it, these workers worked for low wages all to support their families back home. They are the back bone in the company.

In the past ten documents, they gave statistics about Japan’s female workers and Indian’s workers. They also gave a personal story, reviews from priest, economists, and industrialist. All very great, and...
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