Jane Eyre Seminar

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 37
  • Published : May 13, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
Social class

John Reed
Mr.Brocklehurst
St.John

- negative impact to society
- contradicts their action
- difference from the book and victorian concept
> Charlotte Bronte
> Jane wants to be "Angel in the House", but fails to be one > hides behind the curtain to read
> she is passionate
> Rochester wants to marry Jane regardless that she is in a lower social class position. - Money causes one's character to change
> Jane inherits money from John Eyre
- social class can creates one's identity
> Blanche ( not original -> fashion , parties, treats lower class badly) >Rochester (marries bertha for money)
> Brocklehurst (treats badly on the low class students) > St.John (refuse to marry Rosamond)
- social class changes one person's choice
> Jane rejects Rochester because of the social class difference > After she is rich, she returns and marries Rochester
- Social class takes advantage of the low social class
> Brocklehurst (treats badly on the low class students) > Reed (treats Jane [her father is a low social class] badly > low social class

Thesis: Charlotte Bronte has a different perception of the importance of social class in the Victorian era, which contributes towards the growth and development of one's character and place in society.

1, Victorian concept compare the novel (Bronte's ideas)
2, Social class affects identity/character
> original
> Blanche ( not original -> fashion , parties, treats lower class badly) >Rochester (marries bertha for money)
> Brocklehurst (treats badly on the low class students) > St.John (refuse to marry Rosamond)

3, social class changes one person's choice
> Jane rejects Rochester because of the social class difference > After she is rich, she returns and marries Rochester
4, Social class takes advantage of the low social class
> Brocklehurst (treats badly on the low class students) > Reed (treats Jane [her father is a low social class] badly > low social class

You have no business to take our books; you are a dependent, mama says; you have no money; your father left you none; you ought to beg, and not to live here with gentlemen’s children like us. — John Reed

"Wicked and cruel boy!" I said. "You are like a murderer -- you are like a slave-driver -- you are like the Roman emperors!" (Bronte 5)

One, I rather like; the other, no free-born person would submit to, even for a salary.

" I don't think , sir, you have a right to command me , merely because you are older than I, or because you have seen more of the world than I have; your claim to superiority depends on the use you have made of your time and experience"

Paid subordinates! What! you are my paid subordinate, are you? Oh yes, I had forgotten the salary! (Bronte 142)

I grant an ugly WOMAN is a blot on the fair face of creation (Bronte 190)

Whenever I marry," she continued, after a pause which none interrupted, "I am resolved my husband shall not be a rival, but a foil to me. I will suffer no competitor near the throne; I shall exact an undivided homage: his devotions shall not be shared between me and the shape he sees in his mirror." (Bronte 190)

'Yes, Bessie, I can both read it and speak it.'
'And you can work on muslin and canvas?'
'I can.'

Oh, you are quite a lady, Miss Jane! I knew you would be (Bronte 95)

"Doing well! He could not do worse: he ruined his health and his estate amongst the worst men and the worst women. He got into debt and into jail: his mother helped him out twice, but as soon as he was free he returned to his old companions and habits. His head was not strong: the knaves he lived amongst fooled him beyond anything I ever heard. He came down to Gateshead about three weeks ago and wanted missis to give up all to him. Missis refused: her means have long been much reduced by his extravagance;...
tracking img