Jane Eyre

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Moral reconciliation is described when one loses their moral, but reconciles with it at the end. In the novel, Jane Eyre, the main character Jane never goes through moral reconciliation because her morals were never broken. As he reward, she returns to Rochester and marries him.

Through the journey of Jane, she approaches many new places, as well as obstacle. Every event, she is asked the same question--to submit and she gives the same answer--no. For example, in the beginning of the novel when she was still at Gateshead, Mrs. Reed tries to get her to change and be a good child, and instead, Jane is rebellious. Jane refuses the order of Mrs. Reed and continued her actions because that is who she is. Another example of Jane never going through moral reconciliation is when Rochester asked her to marry her even after she discover that Rochester already has a wife--Bertha. Though Jane loved him, she respected herself and her beliefs too much and therefore, left Thornfield. As well as these two, another example is also when is at Moorehouse and she does the same thing. St. John constantly asks Jane to marry him, but every time , she refuses. She doesn't want to give up her independence.

Through the obstacles Jane went through to keep her morals strong, Jane eventually was rewarded at the end. Keeping ones morals is hard and people like to see what people do get when they keep holding on to them. She wed Rochester and got happily married to him. Even then, she is still not submitting because her morals are still there. Rochester is crippled and blind. In addition, Jane has money given from her Uncle John. Because of that, she feels as if they are on equal levels. You can even say that she guides and leads Rochester.

With Jayne Eyre, you often see her set foot in a bad situation, but she is strong, for she never loses her morals.
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