Jane Addams

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s): 40
  • Published: March 15, 2013
Read full document
Text Preview
Jane Addams at Hull house
I. A Biographical Sketch
A. Life
a. Childhood
b. Education
c. As a Sociologist
II. Her Legacy and Influences
A. At Hull House
a. Ideas of a settlement House
b. Hull House was born
c. Activities at Hull House
B. The Chicago Women
a. Social Amelioration
b. Social Ethics and Social Claims
c. Her sociological articles and publications
Critiques
References

JANE ADDAMS: A Biographical Sketch
Life
Childhood
Jane Addams, though often trivialized in popular schooling as an ever-beloved “Lady Bountiful”, was a deeply thoughtful, ethically committed person, of only modest personal wealth, who genuinely tried to love her neighbors, and who in her life time both was on the FBI’s list of “most dangerous radicals” (during the 1920s “Red Scare”) and won the Nobel Prize (in1931). Jane Addams was born in Freeport, Illinois, on September 6, 1860, into a family involved in both business and politics. "Jenny" as they called her as a baby was strongly influenced by her father who lead a very active life. She was the daughter of a very well-to-do gentleman, John Addams. He was in the State Legislature for sixteen years and directed a bank as well as a railroad. And her mother Sarah Weber Addams was a strong woman and "stern disciplinarian" of her children. She ran the "domestic factor" with the help of a hired hand, which enabled her to prepare meals for flour, saw mill and field workers. She took charge of the mills when John was away and often helped the neighbors. When Jane was only three her mother became very ill and died. Jane had five brothers and sisters at the time of her mother's death. Martha, the eldest, took over in raising the family. As a result of not having any siblings her age, Jenny was often given her way and disliked greatly being reprimanded. Although it has been stated that Jane was pretty, she felt self-conscience about the curve in her spine which as a result, made her feel ugly and crippled. She was especially devoted to her father. He taught her tolerance, philanthropy, and a strong work ethic. She became very close to her father, as she was his last link to her mother, and became extremely fond of him as he was of her. She began to mimic everything he had done from the scarring of her hands that came with milling to reading every book in the village library Jane had "half expected and fully hoped to grow up to be her father". Jane states that her father was the one who incorporated her into "the moral concerns of life". Jane recalls in her book, Twenty Years at Hull House, which has been seen as autobiographical, her first encounter with poverty. She remembered asking her father why people lived in awful little houses so close together. Then replied, she would have a large house in the middle of all the terrible small ones. Her sister Martha introduced Anna Halderman into the picture when she became interested in the piano where as her father saw it as an "extravagance". Martha soon died; Anna and John were brought closer together because of this tragedy resulting in marriage in November of 1868. Things around the Addams house soon began to change. Anna brought sophistication and style into a house that had lacked it prior. Jane felt left behind, not being her father's pet any longer, but she gained a new playmate, Anna's younger of two sons. Anna had her own idea about how the young Jane should act which caused anger on the part of Jane that was held in. Later in life she seemed to ignore her most of the time and simply avoided contact to avoid confrontation. Although she seemed to detest her stepmother she learned to act as a lady when introduced to the upper class Illinois in the 1870's because she was the daughter of John Addams, one of the most important people in that area. She used what she learned from her stepmother to move through Chicago's society when she was older. In her teens, Jane Addams had big dreams—to do...
tracking img