Jacksonian Democracy

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Andrew Jackson began a whole new era in American history. During the Jacksonian period, Andrew's greatest accomplishment was the development of the "common man". This development showed man's interest in government and tailoring democracy to satisfy the same ordinary mans wants. He practiced involving the “common man” in issues such as politics and reform movements. The Jacksonian period, in fact, did live up to its characterization of fulfilling the needs of the “common man”.

Involving the “common man” in politics was a must in Jackson's eyes. His strong beliefs and participation in American politics later developed into “what we know now” as the Democratic Party. He believed that every man should have a say in how his country's government operates, no matter what his economic status is. Living out this theory, Andrew Jackson expanded voting from only white male land owners to any man. This gave the lower class a chance to participate in politics. After Jackson's victory of office in 1828, he created the spoils system. The spoils system replaced many long-serving officials with men that elected him to office. Along with the spoils system, Jackson spoke strongly toward the abolition of the Electoral College by constitutional amendment. He felt the President and Vice-President should be voted by the people but his debate was never implemented.

An important issue during the Jacksonian period was reform movements, which means to have a social movement that aims to make a gradual change. The reform movement during this era consisted of numerous events. Jackson put into action a new prison “correctional” system that helped young delinquents rather than punishing them which was created by Dorothea Dix. He also eliminated the elites in politics and this created a rise in the middle class. This rise of the middle class gave fair and equal opportunities to everyone and people were being elected by popular vote and not by being appointed. A veto from Jackson...
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