Jack Kerouac; American Revolutionary

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  • Topic: Beat Generation, Jack Kerouac, The Dharma Bums
  • Pages : 3 (1153 words )
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  • Published : October 8, 1999
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Jack Kerouac

When initially venturing to find the perfect person for this report, I first looked at some very interesting people. I found most of these interesting people were, at second glance, not so fascinating. I don't doubt that every one of them had a drastic impact on the world around them, but I found that none of these people suited the taste I was looking for. I needed a person who was not only interesting and beneficial to this world but also had a certain characteristic…I wanted this person to be "cool." I needed this distinction because I thought in order to do this report I needed to relate to this person in some way, and as a member of the younger generation, with unique views, I thought this quality would make it easier to relate to such a person. My search became frustrating because I could not find any particular person who fit my rubric as ultimately fascinating. I wondered, "What exactly makes a person cool?" In my deliberating I analyzed that word, cool, and thought, "Who better to do a report on than the one who revolutionized that word. Who, you ask may that be? Jack Kerouac, "The King of The Beats", and one of the founding fathers of the Beat Generation.

The American writer Jack Kerouac became the leading chronicler of the beat generation, a term that he used to label a social and literary movement in the 1950s. After studying briefly at Columbia University, he achieved fame with his spontaneous and alternative writing style, particularly the novel On the Road (1957). After the success of this work Kerouac produced a series of similar novels, including The Dharma Bums and The Subterraneans (both 1958), Doctor Sax (1959), Lonesome Traveler (1960), and Big Sur (1962). His autobiographical works reflect a wandering life, with warm but stormy relationships and a deep social lack of expectation satisfied by drugs, alcohol, mysticism, and biting humor. What Jack started was more than just a new style of writing; it was his revolutionary...
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