Itc Emerging Trends

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The role of Information Communication and Technology in the current economies is growing very fast. The technologies are being used by all the sectors, in all the dimensions and in all disciplines of application of the Business Processes. The paper has tried to highlight mainly the trends used by Information Communication and Technology which already exists and which are emerging in the field of education. The challenges faced by the educational planners are also discussed.

Design Methodology
A need for emergence of new trends of the Information Communication and Technology is discussed. The trends which exist in the industry are being discussed, and then the trends which are emerging in the Information and Communication Technologies, the role of ITC in Education is highlighted with the challenges which are being faced.

ICT: A global vibrant industry
Revolution 1: The Computer
Revolution 2: The PC
Revolution 3: The Microprocessors
Revolution 4: The Internet
Revolution 5: Wireless Links

Originality/ Value
Emerging Trends in ICT
ITC in Education


ITC: A Vibrant , Growing Industry

ICT is no longer a Luxury. There may be people or governments which may be a bit less familiar or less enthusiastic. But no doubts that everyone regards it today as a crucial factor and key enabler of the economy. And no economic activity in any country can prevail without use of ICT.

The second point is that the ICT industry, especially in developing countries, and mostly in Asia represents one of the fastest growing sectors.

Three trends in ICT industry:

1) Commoditization of connectivity.
2) Standardization of services
3) Increasing value creation from innovation.

We can think of services at several sub-levels, one is developing the software, other is integrating delivery the software and services.

Next is standardization of software when we talk Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) Or CRM, the point is users and the biggest problem in the industry is that even the user does not know what they need. Moving towards standardization has both pluses and minuses.

On the plus side, it means software will be more accessible, usable and may be cost-effective to use. And on the minus side for the system integrator’s needs, if the software really works as desired, if it is really as easy to work and plug and play as it claims.

So, the standardization of software is going to pose a significant business challenge for many of the companies.

The trend on SAAS- “Software AS A Service”, represents the ultimate example of the standardization of software to the point where the end user may no longer be interested in the nuts and bolts of the software itself, or where the software runs, but it is purely interested in the utility, the services aspect of the software.

It also can be argued that talking about “the ICT” revolution is a misnomer; for there has not been one revolution, but five—so far.

Revolution 1: The Computer

The first revolution started during World War II, with the first large, automatic, general electromechanical calculator, Harvard Mark 1. It was 50 feet long, eight feet tall, and weighed five tons. A couple of years later, ENIAC were presented in Philadelphia, based on radio tubes and practically without any internal memory, yet using 18,000 vacuum tubes and weighing 30 tons. “Computers” became a new catchword, and input-output technology graduated from punch cards to magnetic tape, faster printers, and more languages for programming. Applications also were expanded, from use in academic research to weather forecasting, from airline ticketing to accounting. This development continues; the first ICT revolution is still under way.

Revolution 2: The PC

The second ICT revolution has its roots in the 1970s, when the first “processors on a chip”...
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