It Is the Journey, Not the Arrival That Matters. Discuss This in Relation to Your Prescribed Text and One Other Related Text of Your Choice.

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The arrival of a journey is not as significant as the journey itself. Without considering the journey, the arrival would mean nothing. A journey is more than a movement from one point to another, it is what happens during the journey to an individual that matters, and the arrival is just the outcome of the process of development. Stephen Sommers’ film “The Adventures of Huck Finn” conveys how journeys aren’t straightforward and can have many detours. But, the novel “Catcher in the Rye” featuring Holden Caulfield deeply explores how journeys can have significant impacts on people who are somewhat linked to them, be it present or future. Life for children without a secure home to live in is a rough and unstable way of living, especially when growing into maturity. The novel and film, “The Catcher in the Rye” and “The Adventures of Huck Finn” show this lack of protection, as well as the maturity levels that affect both boys. Holden Caulfield is cynical when he gazes into the mist of a world that appears distorted. For Huck Finn, it is not the same because it is his conscience he struggles with. Both of these characters lack the sufficient guidance that they need to survive in society - it is their role models that help them through these issues as time progresses. Both novels show two boys growing up in a society that has refused to grant them a sense of security and a loving family. The author and director show the complexity of the boys' struggles through their odd choice of role models that help them to grow out of their childlike behaviours. J.D. Salinger and Stephen Sommers show the audience how people can see the world as a place where one has distrust for the integrity or motives of another person. This is shown widely through Holden Caulfield in the way he describes the people he comes into contact with. These are people who the reader would consider normal. "Ernie's a big fat collared guy that plays the piano. He's a terrific snob and he won't even talk to you unless you're a big shot or a celebrity or something, but he can really play the piano". What Holden says here makes sense on some levels, but no one can say something like that without even knowing the person they are speaking of. Holden's cynical ways of thinking are shown in several ways throughout the novel, mainly through the phoniness he sees in others. He is an honest narrator who admits his own faults and weaknesses which created a black cloud that has shadowed him from finding his true place in society. "I'm the most terrific liar you ever saw in your life. It's awful. If I'm on my way to the store to buy a magazine, even, and somebody asks me where I'm going, I'm liable to say I'm going to the opera. It's terrible". Lying is a way of being isolated and Holden wants that. Holden lies throughout the novel to get far away from society. Out of the two boys Holden appears to be more honest about everything. In contrast, Huck is not as much of a cynic as Holden is, but his level of curiosity is much greater because he has a denser and more positive view on society. Huck Finn lies to others when there is no other alternative, but he lies for his own survival rather than out of hatred for society.

The adventures these boys undertake reshape their lives in the way they respect adults and how they come to terms with their conscience. Huck Finn sees Mississippi as a place of peace and tranquillity where he can reflect on his life as well as understand what is wrong with his conscience. "We said there wasn't a home like a raft, after all. Other places do seem so cramped up and smothery, but a raft doesn't. You feel mighty free and easy and comfortable on a raft" he says. Huck enjoys the time spent on the raft; he is free from the "civilising" that Miss Watson tried to teach him as a child. Travelling down the river, Huck is trying to free Jim out of slavery. Eventually, both Huck and Jim are free without even realising it. The trip was a way for Huck to...
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