It Is Often Said That Literature Is a Social Commentary. How Is This True in the Work You Have Read?

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  • Topic: F. Scott Fitzgerald, Wealth, Poverty
  • Pages : 3 (890 words )
  • Download(s) : 27
  • Published : March 6, 2013
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In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel, The Great Gasby, in several aspects, the roles and actions of the different people in the society of the 1920s were mentioned. The juxtaposition between the rich and the poor were shown in the novel such as the two different setting, vivid characters and actions in addition to the motives behind it. The story starts out with Nick, as seen as the protagonist, gaining insight and his individual opinion on society as he narrates the societal status, values and actions between the rich and the poor.

Initially, Nick introduces the contrast in setting and the location using symbolism and metaphors in which he stayed, as being separated by a bay as the West egg and East Egg. Nick, first noted with hesitation, informs the readers that he lived in the Western Hemisphere of the city, where, “the less fashionable of the two.” He then carries on to describe the East egg as “ the white palaces of the fashionable that glittered along the water.”He foreshadows the contrast and series of events that followed by making a statement comparing the East and West egg, commenting that “ To the wingless a more arresting phenomenon is their dissimilarity in every particular except shape and size. Instantly, the readers realizes that both hemisphere of the places represented the different classes of people that inhabit it, and the readers is able to now differentiate the less majestic West and the more luxurious East. However, the West and East egg though portrayed as merely places in the Great Gasby holds great significance and representation of the rich who take everything for granted, and the poor who learn to live by and enjoy the pleasures of life. In depth, Fitzgerald also expressed the same point by elaborating on the houses of Daisy and Tom Buchanan, Nick’s old friends he scarcely knew. When Nick first arrived at the house, he described the house as being more elaborate than his mansion, saying that the lawn started at the beach over sun-dials...
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