Islamophobia in America

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According to research obtained by Cornell University scientists, 92% of Americans watch TV, 87% read newspapers, and 81% specifically watch local or national televised news stations…

Hate, by definition, is a deep and emotional extreme dislike that can be directed against individuals, entities, objects, or ideas. Hatred is often associated with feelings of anger and disposition towards hostility. Unfortunately, hatred in America is publicized, promoted, and praised upon. As if people weren’t hateful enough as to so, the mass media plays a vitals role in the [developing] minds of Americans; most dramatically in times of war or protest. I am overwhelmed with disgust when speaking on the (for lack of a better term) ludicrous behavior associated with people considered Islamophobes. For those who do not already know, Islamophobia is prejudice against, hated towards, or irrational fear of Muslims. Terminologically, Islamophobia came about in the late 1980’s; yet this prejudice against & hatred towards [those belonging to] the Islam culture especially escalated, in America, after the September 11th, 2001 attack on the three World Trade Centers in New York City, which is believed to have been under the supervision and orders of Islamic terrorists belonging to an infamous group known as Al-Qaeda. The mass media, as always, thrives on conflict. Due to the not-so-detailed reports and the misrepresentations of the Islamic culture, the mass media has caused Islamophobia to be of epidemic status world wide.

Islamophobia demonstrates the lack of knowledge that the American people have regarding other cultures; the Islam culture in particular. Some may argue that Hinduism is the oldest form of religion; others may oppose that and consider Islam the oldest. Whatever the case may be, Islam has very deep roots and plays a vital role in history. Why Muslims are considered “bloodthirsty” and treacherous is a question that must be addressed. Personally, I contest these adjectives because of the twisted misconceptions and misleading roles that Muslims played which are written throughout our History books.

The Song of Roland, an eleventh century rendering in verse of an eighth century battle, is a staple of Western Civilization classes. It should be highly considered before jumping into the infamous Crusades that began in 1095. This work of literature provides vague and controversial history but more portentously, the poem has schooled generations of Judeo-Christians to view Muslims, and those belonging to the Islam culture, as perfidious enemies who once threatened the core foundations of Western civilization. The problem, however, is that the entire epic is built on an inquisitive falsehood. The actual army that fell upon Roland and his Frankish soldiers were not Muslim. In the bona fide battle of 778, the “slayers” of the Franks were Christian Basques furious at Charlemagne for prowling their city of Pamplona. Not epic at all, the battle emerged from an unsophisticated dispute in the multifaceted wars of medieval Spain. Only later, as kings and popes and knights prepared for battle in the First Crusade, did bard repurpose the text to serve the needs of an emerging “cross-against-crescent” holy war.

We think of the Crusades as a quintessential “class of civilizations” between the followers of Jesus Christ and the followers of Mohammed. Unless otherwise highly educated, many people believe the Crusades to be strict violence carried out on behalf of the Muslims. Yet in actuality, the “islamophobe” replaces [with Muslims] a diverse range of peoples the Crusaders conflicted with as enemies. There are many examples of these other protagonists hidden throughout the history of the Crusades, such as Jews whom were killed in pogroms on their way to the Holy Land, rival Catholics whom were slain in the Balkans and in Constantinople, as well as Christian heretics whom were hunted down and hanged in southern France. As...
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