Ishikawa Diagram

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  • Topic: Ishikawa diagram, Diagram, Kaoru Ishikawa
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Republic of the Philippines
Tarlac State University
Tarlac City

ISHIKAWA DIAGRAM

__________________________

A Written Report
Presented to
Prof. Nicanor C. Caingat

In Partial Fulfillment
Of the Requirements of the Course
MPA 509 Administrative Decision Making

by:

ROCHIELLE C. AGAID
MPA, October, 2011

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

I.Title Page - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1 II.Table of Contents - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2 III.Objectives of the Report - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -3 IV.Historical Background - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -3 V.Common Uses of Ishikawa Diagram - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -4 VI.Major Categories of Causes - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -4 VII.Questions to be asked while building a Fishbone Diagram - -6 VIII.Criticism in the use of Fishbone Diagram - - - - - - - - - - - - - 8 IX.When to use the Fishbone Diagram - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 9 X.How to solve a problem with a Fishbone Diagram - - - - - - -9 XI.Fishbone Diagram Example - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 10 XII.References - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -12

Ishikawa Diagram

1.Objectives of the Report

a.Discuss the uses of fishbone diagram;
b.Identify when to use the fishbone diagram;
c.Discuss the categories of causes;
d.Discuss the steps how to construct a fishbone diagram;
e.Provide an example of a cause & effect analysis using fishbone diagram

2.Historical Background

Dr. Kaoru Ishikawa, a Japanese quality control statistician, invented the fishbone diagram. He proposed it in the 1960s, he also pioneered quality management processes, and in the process became one of the founding fathers of modern management.

Ishikawa diagrams (also called fishbone diagrams, or herringbone diagrams, cause-and-effect diagrams or Fishikawa) are causal diagrams that show the causes of a certain event. The fishbone diagram is an analysis tool that provides a systematic way of looking at effects and the causes that create or contribute to those effects. Because of the function of the fishbone diagram, it may be referred to as a cause-and-effect diagram. Whatever name you choose, remember that the value of the fishbone diagram is to assist teams in categorizing the many potential causes of problems or issues in an orderly way and in identifying root causes. The cause and effect diagram is used to explore all the potential or real causes (or inputs) that result in a single effect (or output). Causes are arranged according to their level of importance or detail, resulting in a depiction of relationships and hierarchy of events. This can help you search for root causes, identify areas where there may be problems, and compare the relative importance of different causes. The possible causes are presented at various levels of detail in connected branches, with the level of detail increasing as the branch goes outward, i.e., an outer branch is a cause of the inner branch it is attached to. Thus, the outermost branches usually indicate the root causes of the problem.

The Ishikawa Diagram resembles a fishbone - it has a box (the 'fish head') that contains the statement of the problem at one end of the diagram. From this box originates the main branch (the 'fish spine') of the diagram. Sticking out of this main branch are major branches that categorize the causes according to their nature.

3.Common Uses Of Ishikawa Diagram

Common uses of the Ishikawa diagram are:
1.In product design and quality defect prevention, to identify potential factors causing an overall effect; 2.Tool used for team brainstorming, when identifying possible causes for a problem, especially when a team’s thinking tends to fall into ruts. 3.To get a holistic and logical representation of a problem broken...
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