Is Milk Healthy for You?

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Cody Guyer
Lit 101.049
Professor Joyner
Is milk healthy for you?
The start of every mammal’s life begins with the consumption of milk, whether it is from its mother or a bottle. All female mammals produce milk and it’s their responsibility to feed their milk to their offspring. The ultimate reason is to give the offspring all of the vitamins and minerals in milk that will allow them to grow big and strong, while also filling their appetite. Some of the ingredients found in milk that are necessary for our bodies to function on a daily basis are things such as carbohydrates, fat, protein, enzymes, and vitamin D and A. All baby mammals must drink milk to start their life so that they can grow up living strong and healthy lives. Without all of these vital components found in milk, life as we know it may cease to exist. Drinking milk has been the way of life for all mammals and humans since the beginning of time, which only backs up the fact that milk is very healthy for our bodies. Some people think differently of this issue and say that milk is the wrong choice for us and that it can be quite harmful. If we’ve been drinking milk for thousands of years and it contains all of these necessary ingredients for our bodies to function properly, how can milk suddenly be a terrible choice for our bodies? To start off, milk has several different components within it that benefit our bodies and assist in optimum daily functioning. These ingredients also help prove why milk is definitely a healthy choice to drink. Milk contains carbohydrates to give your body fuel by providing energy to the cells in your body. It has protein to help build muscle and other tissues. It also contains enzymes to speed up the process of breaking down materials in your body such as food. Last but not least, it is a great source of vitamin A, for eye sight, and vitamin D, to help absorb the calcium in your body to build bone strength. Despite the fact that on the milk carton it says it contains all of these nutrients, people still believe that milk isn’t a healthy choice. Even with these facts, people still think that milk is bad for us. Don’t get me wrong, there are people in the world that don’t drink milk for legitimate reasons that are unrelated to nutritional factors. One common reason is lactose intolerance. Lots of people around the world are known to have acquired this syndrome. I say “acquired” because more times than not, a person obtains intolerance for the lactose in milk products after the weaning process of birth rather than actually being born with it. The basic definition of lactose intolerance is that people have an insufficient amount of lactase, an enzyme that catalyzes lactose into all of its components, in their digestive system. This could be a legitimate reason not to drink milk –– but these people aren’t the ones saying milk is bad for you. Another reason may be because of the texture or taste. Some people just don’t enjoy the taste that milk has to offer. Others may not like how thick and creamy it may be compared to water. All of these reasons are acceptable explanations to dislike drinking milk. It’s when people don’t drink milk because of nutritional reasons that should be frowned upon. Now that our excused milk drinkers are free of charge, let’s talk about the unexcused. There is an astounding amount of sources that can be found online to support the abolition of milk in the human diet. Many articles rant on about all of the factors of milk that can harm your body. Examples of these statements include things such as milk having the capability to deteriorate bone density. Cindy Jones-Shoeman, a published writer for Natural News, writes in an article from February 2009 about how a woman by the name of Vivian Goldschmidt said, “the animal protein found in milk actually depletes the human body of calcium, exactly the opposite of what milk drinkers expect it to do,” (Jones-Shoeman). Vivian may have an MA in nutrition, but what she...
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