Is God a White Racist

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William R. Jones, author of the book Is God A White Racist?, was born in Louisville, Kentucky. Jones is currently a professor of religion and director of black studies at Florida State University. Licensed as a Baptist Preacher, he brings forward strong religious backgrounds that allow him to intimately analyze the question of his book. Jones poses two major themes in his book Is God A White Racist?; Whether or not God is for the oppressed or the oppressor, and viewing secular humanism or humanism as a theology that will suffice for black’s religious needs today. Jones analyzes many theologians on their standpoint and views of ethnic suffering and the role God plays in the suffering of the oppressed. Jones uses intricate vocabulary to elaborate on his disposition with the theologian’s work; Therefore making his work unclear and difficult to grasp for an individual who does not have the level of vocabulary used. Jones gives an over view analysis of divine racism in part one by reviewing individuals work such as Sartre and Camus, also using the poetry of Countee Cullen to display the grief of black men and women torn between denying the reality of God and accepting him as the real enemy. Jones presents five propositions to define his overview of divine racism. Jones begins his overview with the work Thomas Gossett’s Rig Veda. Using the work of Gossett, Jones describes a God that is hostile to the dark skins and flat nose, which are all characteristics of blacks; Therefore, properly giving a reader of an example of divine racism. Jones presents five propositions to give an overview of divine racism. First, Jones successfully explains the system of an “in” and “out” group of mankind that God sanctioned himself. He explains the divine benevolence toward the “in” group, and divine hostility toward the “out” group. Proposition two of Jones states that “God makes the out group suffer more than the rest of the population”. Posing that God has less affection towards the “out” group. Although this proposition was clear and understandable, it unfortunately repeated the same idea of the first proposition. Jones states that “God is responsible for the imbalance suffering of the “in” and “out” group”. Jones successfully states his meaning of this proposition, “the imbalance of suffering expresses God’s will or purpose”. God’s wrath and hostility toward the blacks Jones uses as his fourth proposition. In addition, “the idea of racial inequality is the work and will of God” is Jones’ fifth proposition. Jones successfully breakdowns the basic concept of divine racism and what it entails. Furthermore, Jones goes on to describe the different appearances of suffering. Golgotha, a symbol of Jesus’ suffering, is one appearance of suffering Jones touches on. Jones states “this to be the love and self sacrificing of God to the salvation of mankind“. Unfortunately, Jones does not take into fact that the death of Jesus was to save all that believed he was the savior. Therefore, not all mankind saw this as salvation or the love of God, i.e. The Jews. Jones also uses Camus’s interpretation of Golgotha, in which he also doesn’t see Calvary as the salvation of mankind as a whole. Jones “multievidentiality” of suffering standpoint is not well supported; He fails to give an adequate definition of “multievidentialy”. Also, his vocabulary made his work hard to understand from a common view. However, Jones does go on to analyze God as the sum of his act. This is an important part of Jones’ book, because this is where the concept of divine racism comes clear. To fully understand this idea, Jones analyzes Sartre’s doctrine of man to support his thought with counter evidence. First, “a man’s character is defined by the sum of his acts”. To speak of a man as loving and caring, his past actions will...
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