Is Genocide Gendered?

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Nadia
 Deeb
 
 

 

310203597
 

5.
 Is
 genocide
 gendered
 and
 how
 important
 is
 gender
 to
 our
  understanding
 of
 the
 phenomenon?
 What
 is
 the
 justification
  for
 rape
 being
 categorised
 now
 as
 a
 technique
 of
 genocide?

  Genocide
 is
 gendered
 and
 gender
 is
 extremely
 important
 to
 our
 understanding
 of
  genocide.
 Connections
 between
 gender
 and
 conflict,
 including
 genocide,
 are
  significant
 areas
 of
 enquiry
 in
 recent
 times.1
 Gender
 is
 defined
 here
 as
 a
 ‘social
  process
 whereby
 divisions
 of
 labour,
 power
 and
 emotion,
 as
 well
 as
 modes
 of
 dress
  and
 identity
 are
 differentiated…between
 men
 and
 women’.2
 For
 the
 purposes
 of
 this
  essay,
 the
 United
 Nations
 definition
 of
 genocide
 as
 ‘acts
 committed
 with
 intent
 to
  destroy,
 in
 whole
 or
 in
 part,
 a
 national,
 ethnical,
 racial
 or
 religious
 group,
 as
 such’
 is
  adopted.3
 The
 gendered
 nature
 of
 genocide
 and
 the
 importance
 of
 gender
 to
 our
  understanding
 of
 gender
 is
 demonstrated
 by
 first
 examining
 the
 issue
 of
 rape,
 then
  the
 gender-­‐selective
 killing
 of
 men
 and
 of
 women,
 and
 lastly
 the
 importance
 of
  gender
 to
 the
 motivations
 of
 the
 perpetrators
 of
 genocide.
 This
 essay
 will
 focus
  primarily
 on
 cases
 in
 which
 there
 is
 considerable
 consensus
 among
 scholars
 that
  genocide
 has
 occurred.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  1
 Geentanjali
 Gangoli,
 ‘Engendering
 genocide:
 Gender,
 conflict
 and
 violence’,
  Women’s
 Studies
 International
 Forum,
 29
 (2006),
 p.
 534;
 Katharine
 Derderian,
  ‘Common
 Fate,
 Different
 Experiences:
 Gender-­‐Specific
 Aspects
 of
 the
 Armenian
  Genocide,
 1915-­‐1917’,
 Holocaust
 and
 Genocide
 Studies
 19,
 no.1
 (2005),
 p.
 5.
  2
 R.
 Charli
 Carpenter,
 ‘Beyond
 “Gendercide”:
 Incorporating
 Gender
 into
 Comparative
  Genocide
 Studies’,
 in
 Adam
 Jones,
 ed.,
 Gendercide
 and
 Genocide
 (Nashville:
  Vanderbilt
 University
 Press,
 2004)
 p.234
  3
 UN
 General
 Assembly,
 Prevention
 and
 punishment
 of
 the
 crime
 of
 genocide,
 9
  December
 1948,
 A/RES/260,
 Article
 II,
 available
 at:
  http://www.unhcr.org/refworld/docid/3b00f0873.html
 [accessed
 1
 May
 2012]
  1
 

Nadia
 Deeb
 
 

 
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