Is Fast Food to Blame For Childhood Obesity

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Is Fast Food a Main Cause to Obesity
Has the enjoyable tastes of a double bacon cheeseburger with extra everything, large fry, and a diet coke really had an effect on the obesity epidemic? The choice of picking this meal, which is fast and efficient enough to hit the spot and cure hunger, is caused by having fast food restaurants around every corner. People are so fast paced in today’s society that the number of home cooked meals has decreased tremendously compared to the number of families waiting in line to get their order and eat on the go. Many people don’t just choose fast food because it is fast and efficient, but they also choose fast food because it is affordable and pleases children. Not only does fast food cause obesity, but obesity contributes too many different diseases that can be long-lasting or have deathly effects. Obesity has been a rising quality in people since the dawn of time. “Since 1980, the rate of obesity has been increasing so steadily that nearly half of all Americans are expected to be obese by 2020” (Anderson) Most overweight people blame their obesity on a genetic deformity that you are born with. If this is true, then how is it possible for someone to weigh 400 pounds and get down to 230 after healthy eating and exercising? There is a new concept called the “Thrifty gene” people are referring to. According to Isabel Remedios, in 2008, “the gene, which allowed for more fat storage, was thought to be an adaptive mechanism to help man survive periods of famine.” In the 20th century that is not the case anymore, “starvation is not a big threat” (Remedios). A passage quoted by Bray stating that ‘The genetic background loads the gun, but the environment pulls the trigger” (Candib 550) indicates that surroundings have completed what genetics has begun. Obesity can also be found in children more these days than at any other time in history. When I was young I remember walking 10 blocks to school twice a day, 5 times a week. I would even walk their on the weekends because there was a huge playground to play on. We rode our bikes, played hide-n-seek with the other neighborhood kids, and when our parents were at work we’d walk or ride our bikes to our friends house 3 streets away. Also, the limit on television was, if we were lucky, one show a night! Kids these days have replaced walking to school with car rides and big yellow busses. They have also got rid of gym and other physical activities for children to do. Kids would rather play video games and sit around and watch television then do something physically productive with their lives. Also a child’s food intake has increased tremendously. “Thirty years ago, kids ate just one snack a day, whereas now they are trending towards three snacks, resulting in an additional 200 calories a day. One in five school-aged children has up to six snacks a day.” (LetsMove) If this laziness in childhood continues, the upcoming generation increases our obesity rates through the roof. Someone needs to keep these little tykes active for their own health and life. The environment plays a big role in how society bases its decisions. They choose effective ways like advertising Fast food restaurants on television and radio commercials, or even billboards that are high enough to see a mile away. Our surroundings play a big factor in what we do in life, which also includes what we choose to conquer our hunger with and where. No one sees billboards advertising apples and oranges. There’s nothing like feeling the craving of hunger crawl through the body and passing a sign that says McDonalds, KFC and Wendy’s at the next exit. The fact that there are these restaurants at every turn on every block completes the deciding factor of where a person will devour his/her next unhealthy meal. Many advertisements are directed toward children because they do not have a sense of nutritional knowledge at such a young age, not to mention a child’s mind is like a...
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