Is Assisted Suicide or Euthanasia Murder?

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Right to die, Suicide, Death
  • Pages : 5 (1944 words )
  • Download(s) : 129
  • Published : November 2, 2009
Open Document
Text Preview
I would like you to step back from your collected thoughts and think about Assisted Suicide. Assisted Suicide is a very delicate and controversial subject around the world and has been for many years. Euthanasia is also a term commonly used for or with assisted suicide. Both of these terms defined mean the purposeful act of death by a terminally ill person going through pain and suffering, with the assistance of a doctor, family member, or any other willing individual. By reading The Merrian-Webster Dictionary and Thesaraus, I have found out that assisted suicide and euthanasia definition and information, have strayed from the original background. Upon reading about this subject, I would not have thought that it all originated from Greece. In fact the “Greeks are who considered assisted suicide and euthanasia first as just simply one mode of dying”. It wouldn’t be acceptable in most countries to use the excuse as “just another mode of dying” in today’s societies in most countries. It would probably be looked at as not being in your right mind to be able to just kill someone. Today, according to, assisted suicide or euthanasia is legal in Netherlands, Belgium, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Luxemburg, Albania, Holland, Switzerland, Tialand, and Oregon in the United States.

Page 2
According to a group of people from ,5th Century B.C.-1st Century B.C. which is before Christ and Christianity, in Rome and Greece, they didn’t take the value of human life seriously like we do in today’s cultures and societies. Back then, abortions and assisted suicides were considered on the same level and basically done without having all of the legal steps and illegal worries involved that we encounter today. In fact, back then “there was a widespread support for voluntary death as opposed to prolonged agony and physicians complied by often giving their patients the poisons they requested.” As I researched further, in the middle ages and 1st century A.D., voluntary suicide had by this time become a less common act, and it was the start of being looked down upon. In the 1800’s, “The earliest American statute explicitly to outlaw assisted suicide is enacted in New York. It is the act of December 10th, 1828, Ch. 4, 1828 N.Y. Laws 19.” So it is starting to seem that people are realizing that it is morally wrong to assist in people’s death. As I moved to the early 1900’s, I learned more and came across records from a Dr. Haiselden who was the Chicago’s German-American Hospital chief of staff in 1915. He was noted about because he had delivered a baby that was deformed and not doing good, and instead of trying surgery, he “let nature complete its bungled job”, with consent from the parents. A day later the baby died. This one action spread from coast to coast and became a remembered point in time. Over the next several years there were many different bills and requests to legalize assisted suicide, but they were turned down. In 1973, Wikipedia Encyclopedia informs that there was a bill

Page 3
passed called the “Patient’s Bill of Rights”. This in part states that the patient has the right to accept and refuse treatment. As the controversy continued, in 1977, the law of The Right to Die was signed in Arkansas, California, Idaho, Oregon, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, and Texas. The upside to the patient’s bill By the 1990’s, a doctor named Jack Kevorkian, MD, was brought forward and into the public’s eye because he was and still believes in assisting people with suicide. Dr. Kevorkian made national headlines with his ideas on how it should be alright to help people die. In 1998, Dr. Kevorkian went on the show “60 Minutes” as he shows a videotape of him injecting willfully, a lethal drug into a man named Thomas Yourk who was suffering from Lou Gehrig’s Disease. Because...
tracking img