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Irish and German Immigrants in the Early 1800s

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Irish and German Immigrants in the Early 1800s

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  • Jan. 2008
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Irish and German Immigrants in the Early 1800s
During the early nineteenth century millions of people left their homes and headed to America in Search of a new life. Many of these people immigrated from Ireland and Germany . Most people came through New York harbor, first seeing the Statue of liberty, and then first setting foot on American soil at Ellis Island . These immigrants had different motives, places they settled, impacts on our culture, and reception by native-born Americans. German immigrants during the early 1800s began coming to the United States in greater numbers in search of freedom. Especially after the Napoleonic Wars many people sought freedom from military involvement and political oppression. Some also came for religious freedom. Nearly 2 million Irish immigrants arrived in America in the 1840s. At this time they came to America because of the potato famine which left thousands starving and homeless. America held the promise of a new life and a new hope. When they arrived in America the immigrants went in search of new places to settle down. Most German immigrants headed toward the west. They settled heavily Ohio , Wisconsin , and Minnesota . They tended to become farmers. The Irish on the other hand did not have enough money when they arrived to move west, so they settled in the cities. They are famous for being in Boston , New York , and other New England cities. Both had large impacts on our culture and receptions by people already here. The Germans were mostly accepted by those in America . They became farmers and entrepreneurs. The Germans looked for jobs as bakers, butchers and tailors. The Irish were not as well received. Most places would not hire them. The Irish became angry against the blacks because they were the biggest competition for jobs. Because of these things the Irish took jobs no one else wanted, they are responsible for much of the railroad being built. The...