Ipv4 to Ipv6 Transition

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I P v 4 TO IP v 6 TRANSITION
– UPDATE 2011
An overview of the new Internet
a ddressing protocol, its implications for
b usiness and government, and Telstra’s
a pproach to the transition.

WHITE PAPER
September 2011

TABLE OF CONTENTS

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

PAGE 3

WHAT IS IPv6?

PAGE 4

IPv4 ADDRESS RUN OUT

PAGE 5

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN IPv4 ADDRESSES RUN OUT?

PAGE 6

GOVERNMENT MANDATES

PAGE 8

INDUSTRY READINESS FOR IPv6

PAGE 10

WHAT DOES THE TRANSITION MEAN FOR BUSINESS?

PAGE 13

WHAT IS TELSTRA’S APPROACH TO THE TRANSITION?

PAGE 14

WHAT SHOULD BUSINESSES DO NOW?

PAGE 16

CONCLUSION

PAGE 18

APPENDIX - IP ADDRESSING

PAGE 19

REFERENCES

PAGE 21

WHY TELSTRA?

PAGE 22

FIGURES & TABLES

FIGURE 1

IPv6 ECOSYSTEM

PAGE 6

FIGURE 2

DUAL-STACK SUPPORTS BOTH PROTOCOLS IN PARALLEL WITHIN ONE NETWORK

PAGE 7

FIGURE 3

EXAMPLE OF A DUAL-STACK ACCESS TO THE INTERNET

PAGE 14

TABLE 1

IP ADDRESS HEADER FORMATS

PAGE 19

TABLE 2

INDIVIDUAL ADDRESSES AND NOTATION

PAGE 20

TABLE 3

UNIQUE LOCAL ADDRESS RANGE

PAGE 20

2

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
IPv4 is the dominant addressing protocol used on the Internet and most private networks today. With the current exponential growth in Internet users worldwide, combined with the limited address range of IPv4, the number of available public IPv4 addresses remaining is very limited. IPv6 is the next-generation Internet protocol that will replace IPv4, providing a vastly expanded address space. This white paper provides an update on the current industry status of IPv6, how the IPv4 to IPv6 transition will affect some organisations, and Telstra’s perspective on the transition.

Internet Transition
IPv4, the dominant addressing
protocol, is rapidly running out
of capacity and will be replaced
by IPv6

The protocol that governs communication on the Internet (and most intranets) today is called Internet Protocol version 4, or IPv4. The popularity of the Internet has caused a shortage of public IPv4 addresses and they are quickly running out, with the global registry of IPv4 addresses from the IANA (Internet Assigned Numbers Authority) exhausted in February 2011 and the Asia-Pacific regional registry in April 2011I. Other Regional Internet Registries (RIRs) are expected to be exhausted between 2012 and 2014II. Once this happens, no more IPv4 addresses will be allocated to Internet service providers (ISPs).

Individual ISP run-out will depend upon how well each ISP manages its address pools compared to the rate of each ISP’s subscriber growth. The transition from IPv4 to IPv6 is a popular issue and one which the industry will spend more time managing in the coming years. The transition is complex and will require IPv6 support by an end-to-end industry ecosystem. The ecosystem includes customer premise equipment, modems/home gateways, network systems, management (OSS/BSS, tools), content and applications.

Telstra’s Approach
Telstra’s approach is based on
the dual-stack solution, allowing
both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses to
co-exist
Telstra will ensure that
customers can migrate to IPv6
at their own pace, with minimal
impact to services

Telstra has been planning for the IPv6 transition for a number of years. We have a defined transition strategy and a well-advanced IPv6 implementation program. Our strategy for IPv6 introduction is based on the dual-stack solution, allowing both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses to co-exist until the transition to IPv6 is complete. This approach will make sure that the transition occurs with minimal impact to customers. Customers will not be forced to move to IPv6 overnight - they can deploy and migrate to IPv6 as they become ready. Telstra is already testing dual-stack technology on a number of key networks and products to seamlessly introduce IPv6. Similar to service providers, businesses face a challenge in undertaking the complex transition of their...
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