Ipr Issues in Digital Environment

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IPR issues in digital environment:
Meeting the challenges

Intellectual Property Rights
IP: Creation of human mind
 IPR: Legal rights to protect artistic or
commercial interests
 But
Knowledge has to be widespread for benefit
of the society and further research


Intellectual Property Rights (IPR)
Intellectual property laws confer a bundle of
exclusive rights in relation to the
particular form or manner in which ideas
or
information
are
expressed
or
manifested.
The
term
"intellectual
property" denotes the specific legal rights
which authors, inventors and other IP
holders may hold and exercise, and not
the intellectual work itself.

IPR: Categories
A patent may be granted for a new, useful, and nonobvious invention, and gives the patent holder a right to prevent others from practicing the
invention without a license from the inventor for a
certain period of time (typically 20 years from the
filing date of a patent application).
An industrial design protects the form of appearance,
style or design of an industrial object (e.g. spare
parts, furniture, or textiles).
A trademark is a distinctive sign which is used to
distinguish the products or services of different
businesses.

A trade secret (which is sometimes either equated
with, or a subset of, "confidential information") is
secret, non-public information concerning the
commercial practices or proprietary knowledge of a
business, public disclosure of which may sometimes
be illegal.
Copyright may subsist in creative and artistic works
(e.g. books, movies, music, paintings, photographs,
and software) and give a copyright holder the
exclusive right to control reproduction or adaptation of
such works for a certain period of time (life of the
author plus several decades).

Copyright
Copyright is a property right which
subsists in accordance with this Part in
the following descriptions of work –
(a) original literary, dramatic, musical or
artistic works,
(b) sound recordings, films or broadcasts,
(c)the typographical arrangement of
published editions.

Copyright
"literary work" means any work, other than a dramatic
or musical work, which is written, spoken or sung,
and accordingly includes
(a) a table or compilation other than a database,
(b) a computer program,
(c) preparatory design material for a computer
program, and
(d) a database;

Copyright Laws don't cover







Ideas
Facts, titles, phrases, Short titles,
slogans,
Extemporaneous speech that remains
unrecorded
Works whose copyright have expired

Stakeholders



Authors
Publishers








Commercial, for-profit
Academic or not-for-profit

Universities
Librarians
Scholars
Public

Websites Advising on Copyright Issues




The National Library of Australia hosts the
website named Preservation Access to
Digital Information (PADI) having
extremely extensive section on copyright
www.nla.gov.au/padi/topics/28.html
Another site www.unc.edu/~unclng
/public-d.htm developed by Laura N.
Gassaway, Director of the Law Library and
Prof. Of Law, University of North Carolina

Websites Advising on Copyright Issues



The Library of Congress www.loc.gov
/copyright/



The British Library maintains a
copyright website containing this
information www.bl.uk
/services/information/copyright.html







www.chin.gc
.ca/English/Intellectual_Property/Copyright_Guide/index
. ‘Copyright guide for Museums and other
Cultural Organisations’ a guide to copyright
law in Canada
www.WIPO.int - World Intellectual Property
Organisation
The UK’s Technical Advisory Service on
Images -maintains web pages devoted to
legal questions (www.tasi.ac.uk/)

Berne Convention
As of 2008, there are 164 countries that
are parties to the Berne Convention. The
Berne Convention requires its signatories to
recognise the copyright of works of authors
from other members of the Berne...
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