Invisible Glass Ceiling

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Invisible Glass Ceiling
There is no dearth of competent women who can take board seats and once shareholders are forced to look beyond the ‘old boys’ club’ they will find enough women to fill them up! While the phrase glass ceiling is metaphorical, many women who find themselves bumping their heads on it find it very real indeed. It is most often used to describe the sexist attitude many women run into at the workplace. In a discussion of ascending the corporate ladder, the word “ceiling” implies that there is a limit to how far someone can climb it. Along with this implied barrier is the idea that it is glass, meaning that, while it is very real, it is transparent and not obvious to the observer. The term glass ceiling is most often applied in business situations in which women feel, either accurately or not, that men are deeply entrenched in the upper echelons of power, and women, try as they might, find it nearly impossible to break through. I feel it is better described as a maze since it more accurately conveys the complexity and randomness that typically occurs better than the glass-ceiling metaphor. Maze and games shouldn’t be there to start with, but women usually are met with stereotyping, and resistance to be promoted. Some believe that if you fill the companies’ pipelines with exceptional women leaders talents, eventually they'll make it into the executive suite kind of “build it they will come” or "just give it time" philosophies have been widely accepted for decades. Unfortunately, it doesn’t work that way. There are many challenges that continue to face women who strive to get to the top, but how long are we going to dwell over spilled milk? The fact that there are women in senior leadership positions, some in industries that are stereotypically male dominated indicates that the barriers can be broken. So what are the real reasons behind anyone including women not reaching a certain level of hierarchy, or promotion; so is it competence, supply,...
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