Investigating Co-Teaching

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Research Proposal: Investigating the co-teaching model and if it’s beneficial and effective for all special education students? Liberty University-EDUC 721

Research Proposal: Investigating the co-teaching model and if it beneficial and effective for all special education students?

This study investigates if special education students can increase their academic performance in a co-taught model versus a resource room or small group setting. Co-teaching in inclusion classrooms is prevalent in schools across the country and is in fact increasing as a service delivery model; yet its effectiveness has not been proved through empirical evidence. (Scheeler, Congdon, & Stansbery, 2010) It is assumed that special education students that are only assigned to the resource room or in a small group setting typically will continue to perform below grade level and perform poorly on test that measure their academic ability, oftentimes this can be attributed to the special education teacher focusing on the students’ deficits, instead of the grade level material that they can receive in a collaborative classroom. The implementation of successful co-teaching classes for special education students could have a profound effect on the students’ ability to excel academically and improve their overall cognitive ability. To determine the effectiveness of the co-teaching model, the research used a sample of 60 random special education students, with a selection criteria based on the students’ previous scores on the Criterion Reference Competency Test (CRCT), and the students’ psycho-education assessment contained in their Individual Education Plan (IEP). The sample group also participated in a randomized pretest/posttest control group. The research utilized a quantitative method of research techniques. Rationale

Students with disabilities and classified as special needs are required to meet similar expectations as the students that are in the general education classes. As a result of these expectations special need students are integrating into inclusive classrooms with their general education peers. All students, including special needs students come from a diverse community of learners and educators have come to the realization that these diverse groups of learners require differentiated instruction. As a result of meeting the needs of all students with diverse learning styles and hold them accountable to the curriculum and state standards, many school systems have turned to collaborative teaching. History, mandates and current research of collaborative teaching, defines the various collaborative methods that are currently being utilized in many schools across the country. This paper will explore how each of these aspects affect the efficacy of the special education student in a collaborative teaching model and further explain the biblical perspective on Christian perceptions on collaborative teaching. Collaborative teaching is a team teaching approach; therefore it should not be approached as an individual idea or concept. Collaborative teaching requires the full integration of all ideas, planning and participation. Oftentimes a collaborative/co-taught classroom will have the content specialist (general education teacher) and the learning support specialist (special education teacher), but the concept of collaborative teaching is not taking place. This is due to one teacher teaching the content, while the other teacher is making copies or preparing the next lesson to be taught by their counterpart. This is not an adequate approach to the concept of collaborative/co-teaching, because both teachers are not fully integrated into delivering the content to the students. A collaborative classroom should be a heterogeneous classroom; therefore the students that are classified as special education should not be separated from the class into the resource room. Moving the students...
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