Intuition Thinking

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The article discusses four problem solving styles based on thinking, feeling, sensation, and intuition. The four styles are Sensation-Feeling, Intuition-Feeling, Sensation-Thinking, and Intuition-Thinking. Usually only one of the characteristics are dominant in an individual and the others are generally “back ups”. However, it should be understood that not everyone can be classified into one of the four pure types.

Experience #1
I use a sensation-thinking problem solving style. This style focuses on the facts and details of a situation when solving a problem. When given a problem to solve, in both my personal life and work settings, I need to have all of the details and facts about the situation before I can begin to formulate a solution. Sensation-Thinking types generally like to work with numbers and things rather than people. This holds true for me because I am an accountant and I like to focus on analytical situations rather than management type issues. Sensation-Thinkers are also uncomfortable when issues go unresolved and they tend to be more comfortable in settings where there are rules and guidelines. I cannot relax until a problem is resolved. If a situation arises at work at 4:30 on a Friday afternoon, I will stay and fix it where others may leave it to be fixed on Monday. I know that I would not be able to enjoy my weekend knowing that I left a problem without a solution. I also like to be given rules and I like to have structure in my work environment. In my current job, they allow a flex-work schedule but I have a hard time taking advantage of it. I think that this problem solving style attributes to some of the stress in my life because of the need for a resolution to everything and the need for rules and guidelines.
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