Introduction to Traverse

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 733
  • Published : June 25, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
Introduction
A traverse consists a series of straight line of known length related one another by known angles between the line. The points defining the ends of the traverse lines are called traverse stations. Traverse survey is a method of establishing control points, their position being determined by measuring the distances between the traverse station which serve as control points and the angles subtended at the various stations by their adjacent stations. The angles are measured using theodolite and the distance measured by the method of traverse. We also measured the distance used the measurement tape. There are two types of traverse, namely the open traverse and the closed traverse. An open traverse originates at a point of known positions and terminates at a point of unknown position whereas a closed traverse originates and terminates at the same points, it is called the closed loop traverse. We were using the closed loop traverse in this survey. For establishing control points, a closed traverse is preferred since it is provides different checked for included angles, deflection angles and bearing for adjusting the traverse. That why we use this method in this project. When an open traverse is used the work should be checked by providing cut off lines and by making observations on some prominent point visible forms as many stations as possible. In a traverse, three stations are considered to be of immediate significance (See Figure 5-1.) below. These stations are referred to as the rear station, the occupied station, and the forward station. The rear station is that station from which the persons performing the traverse have just moved or a point to which the azimuth is known. The occupied station is the station at which the angle-measuring instrument is set up. The forward station is the next station in succession and is the immediate destination of the party. During the traverse (Figure 5-2), the...
tracking img