Introduction of Gps

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 32
  • Published : October 21, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM (GPS)
GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM (GPS)

3802 O/C AMTR DASSANAYAKE
MTS
INTAKE 28
3802 O/C AMTR DASSANAYAKE
MTS
INTAKE 28
HISTORY OF GPS
SEGMENTS OF GPS
APPLICATIONS OF GPS
GEOSTATICS
ASSIGNMENT 01
HISTORY OF GPS
SEGMENTS OF GPS
APPLICATIONS OF GPS
GEOSTATICS
ASSIGNMENT 01

ASSIGNMENT I
Prepare a detail report regarding GPS including following features…… 1. Historical development.
2. Segment of GPS.
3. Wide variety of applications of GPS.

INTRODUCTION

* GPS is a satellite-based navigation system originally developed for military purposes and is maintained and controlled by the United States Department of Defense. * GPS permits land, sea, and airborne users to determine their three-dimensional position, velocity, and time. * It can be used by anyone with a receiver anywhere on the planet, at any time of day or night, in any type of weather. * There are two GPS systems: NAVSTAR - United States system, and GLONASS - the Russian version. * The NAVSTAR system is often referred to as the GPS (at least in the U.S.) since it was generally available first. * Many GPS receivers can use data from both NAVSTAR and GLONASS; this report focuses on the NAVSTAR system.

1. Historical development
* GPS is primarily a navigational system, so a background on navigation will give insight as to how extraordinary the Global Positioning System is. * People first navigated only by means of landmarks - mountains, trees, or leaving trails of stones. * This would only work within a local area and the environment was subject to change due to environmental factors such as natural disasters. * For traveling across the ocean a process called dead reckoning, which used a magnetic compass and required the calculation of how fast the ship was going, was applied. * The measurement tools were crude and inaccurate. It was also a very complicated process. * When traveling over the ocean, people began using the stars as guidelines. * The stars appear different from different locations on Earth so analyzing the stars gave sailors the basic direction to follow.  * Celestial navigation was our primary means of navigation for hundreds of years. It was a time-consuming and complicated task of measuring the angles between stars - a process of triangulation. * The degree of precision was limited.

* The sextant was developed during this time but since it only measured latitude, a timepiece was also invented so that the longitude could also be calculated. * This type of navigation only worked at night and in clear weather which was a great disadvantage. * It was not until the 20th century that ground-based radio navigation systems were introduced. Some are still in use today. * GPS is a satellite radio navigation system, but the first systems were ground-based. * They work in the same way as does GPS: users (receivers) calculate how far away they are from a transmitting tower whose location is known. * When several towers are used, the location can be pinpointed. * This method of navigation was a great improvement, yet it had its own difficulties. An example of such a system is LORAN. * Each tower had a range of about 500 miles and had accuracy good to about 250 meters. * LORAN was not a global system and could not be used over the ocean. Because ground based systems send signals over the surface of the earth, only two-dimensional location can be determined. * The altitude cannot be calculated so this system could not be applied to aviation. The accuracy of such systems could be affected by geography as well. * The frequency of the signal affected accuracy; a higher frequency would allow for greater accuracy, but the user would need to remain within the line of sight. * The first global navigation system was called OMEGA. It was a ground-based system but has been terminated as of 1997. * Timeline of GPS...
tracking img