Intro of Hospitality Industry

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For other uses, see Hospitality (disambiguation).
This article is about the definition of hospitality. For academic study of hotel management, see Hospitality management studies and Hospitality industry. |[pic] |This article's tone or style may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. Specific concerns may be found on the talk page. See| | |Wikipedia's guide to writing better articles for suggestions. (December 2007) |

Hospitality is the relationship between a guest and a hosts, or the act or practice of being hospitable. Specifically, this includes the reception and entertainment of guests, visitors, or strangers, resorts, membership clubs, conventions, attractions, special events, and other services for travelers and tourists. "Hospitality" can also mean generously providing care and kindness to whoever is in need.

|Contents | |[hide] | |1 history of Hospitality | |2 Contemporary usage | |3 Hospitality around the world | |3.1 Biblical and Middle Eastern | |3.2 Classical World | |3.3 Hospitality in Celtic Cultures | |3.4 Hospitality in India | |4 Cultural value or norm | |5 Hospitality ethics | |5.1 Hospitality Ethics in practice | |6 See also | |7 References | |8 Further reading | |9 External links |

[pic][edit] history of Hospitality

The word hospitality derives from the Latin hospes, which is formed from hostis, which originally meant a ) to have power. The meaning of "host" can be literally read as "lord of strangers."[1] hostire means equalize or compensate. In the Homeric ages, hospitality was under the protection of Zeus, the chief deity of the Greek pantheon. Zeus was also attributed with the title 'Xenios Zeus' ('xenos' means stranger), emphasizing the fact that hospitality was of the utmost importance. A stranger passing outside a Greek house could be invited inside the house by the family. The host washed the stranger's feet, offered food and wine, and only after the guest was comfortable could ask his or her name. The Greek concept of sacred hospitality is illustrated in the story of Telemachus and Nestor. When Telemachus arrived to visit Nestor, Nestor was unaware that his guest was the son of his old comrade Odysseus. Nonetheless, Nestor welcomes Telemachus and his party lavishly, thus demonstrating the relationship between hostis, "stranger," and hostire, "equalize," and how the two combine in the concept of hospitality. Later, one of Nestor's sons slept on a bed close by Telemachus to take care that he should not suffer any harm. Nestor also put a chariot and horses at Telemachus' disposal so that he could travel the land route from Pylos to Sparta rapidly, and set his son Pisistratus as the charioteer. These illustrate the two other elements of ancient Greek hospitality, protection and guidance. Based on the story above and its current meaning, hospitality is about compensating/equalizing a stranger to the host, making him feel protected and taken care of, and at the end of his hosting, guiding him to...
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